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Full text of "Savannah State College Bulletin--Special Issues"

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SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE ll8RAf?Y^ 

STATE OOULJEGE'' BRANCH* " f 
SAVANNAH, GA. ' ' 




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SAVANT Sim COLjiGE UBRARY 

STATt COUJEQC BRANCH 

SAVANNAH, GA. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/savannahstateco196365sava 



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PE COLL€Gf BRANCH 



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Attractive Miss SSC, De- 
lores Bo wens, a graduate 
of Monitor High School 
in her home town, Fitz- 
gerald Ga. Has chosen 
mathematics as her 
major. 



FOREWORD 




WELCOME, FRIENDS! 

And so, you have come again; 
Really we're so glad to see you; — 
We are glad that despite storm or rain. 
Repeatedly you do come through. 
Your loyalty means you are ever true. 
Hence, sincere thanks ive give you; 
For today is here — present, realizable, 
But tomorrow (who knows?) may present 
the unbelievable. 

(J. Randolph Fisher) 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE BULLETIN 

President Dr. Howard W. Jordan 

Director of Public Relations and Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Scott 

Issue Editor J. Randolph Fisher 

Student Editor. Gwendolyn Buchanan '64 

Photographer _ Robert Mobley 

Student Assistants Adelle Batchelor '65, 

Marvin Chapman '65, Walter P. Brown '65 

Volume XVII October, 1963 Number 1 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly in October, December, 
February, March, April, and May by Savannah State College. Second Class mail 
privileges authorized at Savannah, Georgia. 



MELDRIM HALL 

The Administration Headquarters. Auditorium 
and classrooms. 







"'if , 






because, after aWs said and done, mas 
we not admit that 

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, 
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day 
To the last syllable of recorded time, 
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools 
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief 

candle ! 

Life's but a walking shadoiv, a poor playei 
That struts and frets his hour upon the stagt 
And then is heard no more: it is a tale 
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, 
Signifying nothing. 

Shakespeare 



FRIENDS, WE EXTEND TO YOU 
HEARTFELT GREETINGS! 



<u, 








< 



lly famous educator, writer and speaker, 
rd Jordan, Jr., President of Savannah 
lege, native of Beaufort, South Carolina, 
ormer student of Savannah State is 
)y to serve as the sixth president. 



Savannah State College's first lady, 
the charniing Mrs. Ruth Menefee 
Jordan, comes to us from South Caro- 
lina State College where she received 
her B.S. Degree, and served as 
Assistant Registrar. 



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SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

State College Branch 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



OF 
IDENT 



riNGS TO ALUMNI AND FRIENDS 
OMECOMING DAY 

is a happy privilege to extend a warm, sincere, and hearty welcome to the Savannah State College alumni 
iends who have come back home to visit us on this special day. To all of you, the College family extends 
:ere wishes for an enjoyable occasion. We appreciate your presence here today and your love and interest 
activities of the College. Through your great interest, support, and assistance, Savannah State College will 
te to move forward in the academic world. 

am happy to welcome and extend greetings to our friends from Alabama State College on this Homecoming 
We have always enjoyed friendly athletic rivalry with Alabama State College, carried on in the spirit of 
porlsmanship, and we look forward to a continuation of this very fine relationship in the years ahead. 

\omecoming Day is important to us here at Savannah State College for it is always a great occasion when 
'turn to visit old friends and renew old acquaintances. Mrs. Jordan and I hope to greet each of you per- 
y after the game. 

7hen you return to your homes and occupations you carry with you our prayers. Every good wish to you 
ours. 

HOWARD JORDAN, JR., 
President 






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9 



FOREWORD 




MELDRIM HALL 

The Administration Headquarters. Auditorium 
and classrooms. 



■ - 



■>& 



WELCOME, FRIENDS! 

And so, you have come again; 
Really we're so glad to see you; — 
We are glad that despite storm or rain. 
Repeatedly you do come through. 
Your loyalty means you are ever true, 
Hence, sincere thanks ice give you; 
For today is here — present, realizable. 
But tomorrow (who knows?) may present 
the unbelievable. 

(J. Randolph Fisher) 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE BULLETIN 

President Dr. Howard W. Jordan 

Director of Public Relations and Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Scott 

Issue Editor J. Randolph Fisher 

Student Editor Gwendolyn Buchanan '64 

Photographer _ Robert Mobley 

Student Assistants Adelle Batchelor '65, 

Marvin Chapman '65, Walter P. Brown '65 

Volume XVII October, 1963 Number 1 

The Savannah Stale College Bulletin is published yearly in October, December, 
February, March, April, and May by Savannah Slate College, Second Class mail 
privileges authorized at Savannah, Georgia. 



because, after aWs said and done, 
ive not admit that 



mi, 



Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, 
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day 
To the last syllable of recorded time, 
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools 
The ivay to dusty death. Out, out, brief 

candle ! 
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor play* 
That struts and frets his hour upon the sta$ 
And then is heard no more: it is a tale 
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, 
Signifying nothing. 

Shakespeare 



FRIENDS, WE EXTEND TO YOU 
HEARTFELT GREETINGS! 





onally famous educator, writer and speaker, 
)ward Jordan, Jr., President of Savannah 
College, native of Beaufort, South Carolina, 
, former student of Savannah State is 
appy to serve as the sixth president. 



Savannah State College's first lady, 
the charirfing Mrs. Ruth Menefee 
Jordan, comes to us from South Caro- 
lina State College where she received 
her B.S. Degree, and served as 
Assistant Registrar. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

State College Branch 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



ICE OF 

'RESIDENT 



< EETINGS TO ALUMNI AND FRIENDS 
HOMECOMING DAY 



It is a happy privilege to extend a warm, sincere, and hearty welcome to the Savannah State College alumni 

4 friends who have come back home to visit us on this special day. To all of you, the College family extends 
q sincere wishes for an enjoyable occasion. We appreciate your presence here today and your love and interest 
P he activities of the College. Through your great interest, support, and assistance, Savannah State College will 

5 tinue to move forward in the academic world. 

jj> / am happy to welcome and extend greetings to our friends from Alabama State College on this Homecoming 
I- v. We have always enjoyed friendly athletic rivalry with Alabama State College, carried on in the spirit of 
d sportsmanship, and we look forward to a continuation of this very fine relationship in the years ahead. 

Homecoming Day is important to us here at Savannah State College for it is always a great occasion when 

Z i return to visit old friends and renew old acquaintances. Mrs. Jordan and I hope to greet each of you per- 

q lally after the game. 

i 
, When you return to your homes and occupations you carry with you our prayers. Every good wish to you 

A yours. 

HOWARD JORDAN, JR., 
President 

2 Of. * 



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DID YOU KNOW THAT — 

Savannah State College is located off Taylor 
Road and Falligant Avenue, in the historic city of 
Savannah. Georgia, which is the oldest city and 
chief seaport of the state, as well as the first capitol. 

The campus, comprising one hundred and thirty- 
six acres, presents a setting of matchless natural 
beauty. Among the more outstanding buildings are 
the attractively designed and modernly constructed 
Camilla Hubert Hall: Adams Hall; Meldrim Hall, 
consisting of administrative offices, the audito- 
rium, and some classrooms. 

There are several new buildings on the campus 
which includes: A million dollar technical science 
building; a half-million dollar library; Wiley 
Gymnasium, which is annexed to Willcox Gymna- 
sium; Richard R. Wright Hall; a sewage disposal 
system, and a heating plant. 

The science building has been remodeled, and 
the College has a language laboratory equipped 
with various types of machines, and a reading 
clinic with modern facilities. Hill Hall has been 
remodeled and now houses a beautiful center, post 
office, snack bar, book store, and the offices of 
Student Personnel Services, and Testing and Guid- 
ance. Morgan Hall has been remodeled and houses 
the business department. The college infirmary, a 
modern eighteen-bed infirmary, is provided for 
students who require treatment or confinement ol 
minor illness, has been remodeled. 



A new 100-room, $300,000 dormitory for 
women students is under construction, and is ex- 
pected to be completed by the 1963-64 school year. 
The new dormitory will consist of a lobby, lounge 
and recreation room, apartment facilities for dor- 
mitory director, hair grooming room, laundromat 
and 50 bedrooms designed for two students per 
room. 



Technical Science Building — Houses Engineering T 
nology, Chemistry, Reading Clinic and rooms for ger 
classroom instructions. 



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Degrees Offered at Savannah State 

Savannah State College offers courses leading to th< 
baccalaureate degree ivith a major in each of these areai 
of concentration: Biology, Building Construction-Tech 
nology, Chemistry, Economics, Electronics-Technology 
Elementary Education, English, Food, Nutrition & Insti 
tution Management, General Business Administration 
Mathematics, Mechanical Technology, Secondary Educa 
tion, Secretarial Science, Social Sciences, and Textile: 
and Clothing. 

Teacher education programs in the following fields a, 
Savannah State College have been approved by the Geor 
gia Division of Teacher Education and Certification; ele 
mentary education; secondary education, with a concen 
tration in each — 1 ) business and distributive education 
subjects, 2) English, 3) French, 4) general science 
5) industrial arts education, 6) mathematics, 7) socia* 
studies, 8) Spanish, 9) trade and industrial education; 
grades 1-12, 1) art education, 2) health and physical 
education, 3) music education, 4) teacher librarian. 



EDITORIAL 



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TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW 

This day was yesterday to-morrow nam'd 
To-morrow shall be yesterday pro- 

claim'd : 
To-morrow not yet come, not far away, 
What shall to-morrow then be call'd? 

To-day. 

John Owen 



. . . For Such a Time as This 

The Bible account of Queen Esther tells of Mordecai's urging 
Esther to go to King Ahasuerus" and plead for the lives of her people. 
Fearful, Esther hesitated. But Mordecai insisted and finally con- 
vinced her with those electrifying words which have come on down 
through the generations of man: ". . . and who knoweth whether thou 



art come to the kingdom 



for such a time as this' 



And so has Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr.. come to the presidency of 
Savannah State College. He has for many years been actively en- 
gaged in community activities, serving as chairman of charitable 
drives and as a member of adult education programs aimed at better 
community living among residents of Orangeburg and Orangeburg 
County, South Carolina. A highly religious man, he is a member of 
St. Paul's Episcopal Church which he has served as a member of the 
Vestry and as secretary. 

A veteran of World War Two, he entered the Army as a private 
in 1942, completed Officers' Candidate School in 1943, and served 
as an officer in the European Theatre of Operations until his separa- 
tion from military service in 1946. 

Dr. Jordan served as chairman of the Orangeburg County Red 
Cross Campaign in 1947, as chairman of the Orangeburg County 
Cancer Campaign in 1948-49, and as Program Chairman of the 
Palmetto Education Association in 1948-50. He received the 
Founders' Day Certificate of Achievement, indicative of graduation 
with high honors, from New York University in 1957. The Bulldog 
(annual yearbook at South Carolina State College) was dedicated 
in honor of Dr. Jordan in 1962. 

Thus, possessing youth, geniality, training, experience, and the 
goodwill of his peers, President Howard Jordan, Jr. (one-time Sa- 
vannahian and one-time Savannah Stater) has come back to Savan- 
nah State College — for such a time as this. 

J. RANDOLPH FISHER 



HONORS 




Tomorrow is 


St. 


Valentine's day 


All in 


the morning 


betime, 


And I a 


maid 


at 


your 


window, 


To be 


your 












Anonymous 




Tomorrow, Miss SSC and attendants 
will still be beautiful. Left to right, 
Nora Williams, Statesboro, Georgia, 
Sociology major; Matilda Bryan, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia, Social Science 
major; Deloris Bowens (Miss SSC), 
Fitzgerald, Georgia, and Idella Glover, 
a Chemistry major, Savannah, 
Georgia. 




Miss Camilla Hubert Hall — 
September winds blew in many 
lovely ladies of the freshman 
class. The charming Miss Camilla 
Hubert Hall is a splendid 
example of the many freshman 
beauties. She is Miss Jeanette 
Moore, a French major who hails 
from Dublin, Georgia. 



Lovely Miss Social Science and 
her attendants: Burnice Cofer 
(Center), Atlanta, Georgia; 
Murnace Coleman (left), Jack- 
sonville, Florida, and Sandra 
Heywood, Savannah (right), 
make three beautiful 
representatives. 



Lovely Miss Business, Ellas* 

Daniels, a Senior, of Savannah 

Georgia. 




Miss Phi Beta Sigma, Lillian Hill, 
a charming young lady, major- 
ing in Social Science, of 
Madison, Georgia. 



Miss YWCA, attractive Rita 
Green, Senior, majoring in Ele- 
mentary Education, of Bruns- 
wick, Georgia, and her attend- 
ants, Mary Nell Pulling and 
Patrica Brown. 



Miss Sigma Gamma Rho, charm- 
ing Jessie Scott, an Art major, 
of Sylvania, Georgia. 





The attractive young ladies are 
Miss Delta (center) and her at- 
tendants. Left to right, Birdy 
lones, majoring in Elementary 
Education, Riceboro, Georgia ; 
Wary Smith, majoring in Biology, 
Cartersville, Georgia, and Lois 
Carson, majoring in English, 
Winter Park, Florida. 



Miss Wright Hall, lovely Mattie 
Lattimore of Milledgevillei, Geor- 
gia, majoring in Elementary 
Education. 



Charming Miss Junior and at- 
tendants, Sadie Collins of Savan- 
nah, Izora Smith of Milledge- 
ville, Georgia, and Frankie 
Southerland of Fitzgerald, Geor- 
gia. All three are Elementary 
Education majors. 





eautif ul Artvetta Doanes, Miss 
Kappa Alpha Psi, a Business 
major of Atlanta, Georgia. 



Charming and most attractive is 

Miss Alpha Phi Alpha Alice 

Murray, a Sociology major, 

Savannah, Georgia. 




m 'Mm 



Charming Miss AKA, Donna 
Pikett, Junior, majoring in Social 
Science, from Savannah, Geor- 
gia. Her attendants, Margie Sim- 
mons majoring in Elementary 
Education, from Monroe, Geor- 
gia, and Dawn Hollingshed, 
majoring in Elementary Educa- 
tion, of Pelham, Georgia. 



Lovely Miss Omega and attend- 
ants, Freda Hunter, Junior, 
majoring in Elementary Educa- 
tion, from Fitzgerald, Georgia; 
Kermetta Shipman, Junior, 
majoring in Chemistry, from 
Claxton, Georgia, and Irene 
Elmore, Junior, Business major, 
of Savannah, Georgia. 



Miss Sophomore, a plum, accord- 
ing to Webster's dictionary is a 
"smooth- skinned fruit." A 
Sophomore plum is a term that 
describes the lovely sophomore 
queen, Miss Catherine Shavers. 
Miss Shavers hails from Fitz- 
gerald, Georgia. She aspires a 
career in the social sciences. 




Miss SNEA, an attractive Ele- 
mentary Education major, Lille 
M. Cummings, senior, who will 
lead future teachers. Miss Cum- 
mings graduated from Risley 
High School, Brunswick, Georgia. 



Charming Miss Senior and attendants (1. to r.), 
Gwendolyn Buchanan, a Sociology Major, of 
Douglas, Ga.; Matilda Wiley (Miss Senior), Sa- 
vannah, Georgia, majoring in Foods and Textiles, 
and Willie N. Caleb, of Savannah, Georgia, 
majoring in Elementary Education. 



Miss Technical Science, lovely 
Evelyn Ellison, Sophomore, major 
in Home Economics, of Savan- 
nah, Georgia. Her attendants are % 
Mamie Fyrer and Beverly 
Palmer. 





Miss Lampado, lovely Minnie 
Thompson, Sophomore, major- 
ing in English, from Ocilla, 
Georgia. 



Lovely Delores Mitchell, Miss 

Zeta, a major in Elementary 

Education. 



! 





Savannah State College 70-piece marching Tigers directed by Samuel C. Gill. 



Mr. Samuel Gill, dis- 
tinguished Director of 
the Marching Tigers. 




Brass Section: Kneeling, left to right: Kenneth Swindell, James 
Thompson, Troy Hickman, Melvin Washington, Edgar Jones, Leon 
Chaplain, Ann Wells, Clifford Speights. Standing, left to right: 
Frank James, Grady Riggs, Paul Johnson, Ann Brown, Chris- 
topher Wiggins, James Brown, James Bell, Thomas Beck. 




Drum Major, 
Marvin Kirkland. 




Percussion: Kneeling, left to right: Robert Baker, Addie 
Scott, Brenda Trudell, Beverly Wallace, Terry Dempsey, 
Lydia Joyce, John D. Smith. Standing: Ralph Stell, 
George Foy, Walter Holt, Victor Cooper, Edward Stephens, 
Vernon Hector, Michael Brown, James Owens. 



'&&*9r?rT 





Drum Majorettes: Tomasina Jenk- 
ins, Lucille Brock and 
Delores Dempsey. 



Senior Band members: Linwood 
Ling, Williams Memorial, St. 
leorge, S. C; Delores James, St. 
lugustine High, St. Augustine, 
lorida; Robert Stephens, A. E. 
5each High, Savannah, Georgia. 



Majorettes: Paulette Sibert, Sol Johnson, Sa- 
vannah; Betty Perimont, Turner High, Atlanta; 
Patricial Sibert, Pope Pius X, Savannah; Betty 
Loadholt, A. E. Beach High, Savannah; Dorothy 
Scott, A. E. Beach, Savannah; Delores Hall, 
Tompkins, Savannah; Norma Stanton, 
Jacksonville, Florida. 



FOOTBALL 




Savannah State College 
Tigers Football Roster — 1963 



No. Name Class Age Hi. Wi. Location 

Ends 

80 Bower, Maurice 1 18 6' 0" 170 Savannah, Ga. 

81 Carter, Fred 3 23 5' 11" 176 Steubenville, Ohio 

83 Rawls, Oree 4 21 6' 0" 188 Waycross, Ga. 

82 Robinson, Hershel 4 21 6' 0" 185 Atlanta, Ga. 

86 Saunders, John 1 19 5' 10" 173 ..Waynesboro, Ga. 

87 Rood, William 2 21 6' 0" 181 Waycross, Ga. 

88 Singleton, Harold 1 18 5' llVa" 155 Savannah, Ga. 

Tackles 

72 Carthon, John 2 21 5' 11" 190 Thomaston, Ga. 

76 Lewis, Benard 3 22 5' 11" 224 Steubenville, Ohio 

75 Lockett, Bobby 4 21 5' 11" 176 Macon, Ga. 

74 McNeil, Clarence 2 20 5' 11" 226 Savannah, Ga. 

73 Newberry, James 1 19 5' 11" 225 Douglas, Ga. 

Guards 

62 Bell, Robert 1 20 5' 7" 166 Vidalia, Ga. 

65 Carter, Bobby 1 18 5' 8" 193 Savannah, Ga. 

60 Gibson, Bennie 2 21 5' 11" 195 Macon, Ga. 

64 Howard, Willie 2 20 5' 8" 162 Savannah, Ga. 

69 Kelly, Steven 1 17 5' 11" 193 Miami, Fla. 



No. Name Class Age Hi. Wl. Location 

Centers 

53 German, William 1 20 5' 7" 175 Savannah, Ga. 

52 Graham, Horace 1 19 5' 6" 170 Nomiar, S. C. 

51 Sears, John 1 19 5' 9" 170 Savannah, Ga. 

55 Simmons, William 1 18 5' 8V2" -..165 Frogmore, S. C. 

Quarterbacks 

12 Ellis, Frank 2 19 5' lO'A" 165 Savannah, Ga. 

16 Kenner, John 1 19 5' 11" 169 Augusta, Ga. 

14 Pratt, McArthur 3 21 5' 9" 176 Miami, Fla. 

Halfbacks 

35 Cohen, Willie 1 22 5' 10" 182 Orlando, Fla. 

31 Cunningham, Paul 1 19 5' 7" 176 Steubenville, Ohio 

10 Johnson, Jerome 2 19 5' 7" 159 Jersey City, N. J. 

11 Miller, Robert 1 19 5' 6" 148 Savannah, Ga. 

15 Saxby, Robert 3 19 5' 9" _ 165 Savannah, Ga. 

Fullbacks 

33 ...Barnes, John 2 19 5' 9" 195 Steubenville, Ohio 

34 Adams, Bobby , 1.... .19.., 5' 9" 1,61 Savannah, Ga. 

32 Blakely, John 1 21 5' 9" 190 Waynesboro, Ga. 

13 Anderson, Richard 3 21 5' 9" 168 Winter Park, Fla. 



Managers: Edward, Roscoe,- Roberts, Calvin. Spotter: Baldwin, Lucious. 

Athletic Staff: Dr. E. J. Dean, Chairman, Athletic Committee,- Albert E. Frazier, Athletic Director,- Richard K. Washington, Head Football Coach; 
Albert E. Frazier, Backfield Coach,- Frank Simmons, Line Coach,- Wilton C. Scott, Director of Public Relations and Publicity,- Robert Mobley, Photographer,- 
Edward L. Turner, Statistician and Sports Editor,- Walter P. Brown, Associate Sports Editor. 




SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE TIGERS 

vs. 
ALABAMA STATE COLLEGE HORNETS 

of 

Montgomery, Ala. 

Saturday, November 9, 1963 

Time — 2 P. M. S.S.C. Athletic Field 




MISS ALABAMA STATE AND HER 
ATTENDANTS 

Left to right: Leah R. Nicholson, Junior 
Attendant; Carolyn Yelling-, Senior At- 
tendant; Lucy L. Moore (Senior), Miss 
Alabama State; Felesia Y. Glover, Fresh- 
man Attendant; Alma Smith, Sophomore 
Attendant. 



Dr. Levi Watkins, President 
Alabama State College 





SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE TIGERS: (L. to R.) First Row: Frank Simmons, Jerome Johnson, Bennie Gibson, Maurice 
Bowens, John Kenner, Harold Singleton, Bernard Lewis, Richard Washington. Second Row: Paul Cunningham, Robert 
Bell, James Newberry, Horace Graham, William Simmons, John Carthon, Steven Kelly, John Barnes. Third Row: John 
Saunders, Hershel Robinson, Richard Anderson, William Rood, Oree Rowls, Bobby Lockett, Frank Ellis. Fourth Row 
Johnny Sears, Clerance McNeil, Robert Miller, Bobby Carter, Willie Cohen. Fifth Row: Calvin Roberts, Bobby Adams, 

Fred Carter, Willie Howard. 





- %■ 

Ill 


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/ ' -' ' . 









Albert Frazier. Athletic Director 




Uoacnes — Albert Fraizer, Athletic Director; 

Richard Washington, Head Coach and 

Frank Simmons, Line Coach. 








Bobby Lockett, Senior, tackle, from 
Macon, Georgia. 




Fred Carter, one of the most 
dangerous ends in the conference. 



F y 

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Clarance McNeil, a Junior, tackle 
of Savannah, Georgia. 




Richard Anderson, a halfback, a 
Junior from Columbus, Georgia. 





McArthur Pratt, a Junior from 
Miami, Florida, is one of the out- 
standing quarterbacks. 





To-day is ours; what do 
we fear? 

To-day is ours; we have 
it here. 

Let's treat it kindly that 
it may 

Wish, at least, with us to 
stay. 

Let's banish business, 
banish sorrow; 

To the gods belongs to- 
morrow. 

Abraham Cowley 





Oree Rawls, Senior, Co-Captain and 
end, from Waycross, Georgia. 




Jerome, Johnson, Sophomore, half- 
back, from Macon, Georgia. 




jilt 

A. 



Frank Ellis, Junior, quarterback, 
from Savannah, Georgia. 




John Carthon, Sophomore, tackle, 
from Thomaston, Georgia. 




jJTm 



ItuJf m 



Hershel Robinson, Senior, an out- 
standing end and captain, of 
Atlanta, Georgia. 




John Barnes, Sophomore, explosive 
fullback from Steubenville, Ohio. 



10 



FACULTY 




you should know . 



1KU9T 

mild a little fence of trust 

Around to-day; 
Fill the space with loving work, 

and therein stay; 
Look not through the sheltering bars 

Upon to-morrow; 
God will help thee fear what conies 

Of joy or sorrow. 

Mary Frances Butts 







s Loreese E. Davis, Dean of Women, shown counseling 
coed Earline Freeman. 




Dr. Stephen M. McDew, Jr., college physician, takes the blood 
pressure of Bennie XV.. Brown. 




dr. Wesley L. Johnson, Jr., 
Comptroller. 

Dr. Elmer J. Dean, chairman 
and professor of Social Science 
is serving as chairman of com- 
mittee on intercollegiate 
athletics. 



Mr. J. Randolph Fisher, Associate Professor of 

English, confers with one of his students, in 

World Literature. 



Dean of Men, Nelson R. Freeman, 
talks with the student body. 



Mrs. Gertrude Holmes, College Nurse, 
works at her desk in the infirmary. 

Dr. Joan Gordon, professor, 

serving as Installing Officer for 

Camilla Hubert Hall Ceremonial 

Program. 






ACTIV 1T1ES 








TO-MORROW NEVER COMES 

Some say "to-morrow" never comes, 
A saying often thought right; 
But if to-morrow never came, 
No end were of "tonight." 
The fact is this, time flies so fast, 
That e'er we've time to say 
"To-morrow's come," presto! behold! 
To-morrow proves "today." 

Unknown 



Charming Mary Anderson, a senior, majoring in 

Sociology and minoring in Physical Education, 

of Glennville, Georgia. 



* m& • -y'-'4 m. 



p 




Camilla Hubert Hall officers for 1963-64: Virginia Jackson, 

L.ula Johnson, Freda Hunter, Kosemary Fatton, Elizabeth 

Tucker, Jean Stewart and Patrica Ryan. 



The two lovely Freshmen shown working a mathematl 
problem in Mr. J. B. Clemman's class are: Artis McCray fn 
Ocilla, Georgia and Dorothy McPhatters from 
Statesboro, Georgia. 





Miss Idella Glover, Senior, Savannah State 

College, performing an experiment 

in chemistry. 



Attractive Madie Berry, a senior, major- 
ing in Sociology poses for the photog- 
rapher. She is from Glennville, Georgia. 



Two lovely co-eds, Miss Betty 
Gordon, majoring in Mathema 
and Miss Claudia Quarterman, ma 
ing in General Science. 



12 




*fc 




Assistant Professor of Social Science, Rev. Blanton E. Black, delivering 
address at the first vesper of the school year. 



an 



'active Laura Drayton poses for a snapshot 
the tennis court. Lovely Miss Drayton is 
an Elementary Education major, of 
Savannah, Georgia. 





Freda Brewton, a senior majoring in Chemistry and 

Dr. Charles Pratt, professor, observes an experiment of 

Evaporation under reduced pressure. 



Typical football practice on Tigers Gridiron. 



President of Student Council, Jack E. Millines, 
addressing the student body in assembly. 





ident of Student Council, Jack E. Millines (center), Leander Merritt, 
president and James Sapp, Sophomore representative to Student 
Council, during an assembly program. 




Students Charles Hall and 
Cooper, both Juniors, are 
running test: checking 
elongation of steel speci- 
men under load. Both are 
majors in Engineering and 
Technology. 



TOMORROW 

Where art thou, beloved Tomorrow? 

When young and old, and strong and 
weak, 
Rich and poor, through joy and sorrow, 

Thy sweet smiles we ever seek, - - 
In thy place - - ah! Well -a- day! 

We find the thing we fled - - Today. 

Percy Bysshe Shelley 
13 





The attractive Miss National 
Alumni, Mrs. Ora M. Washing- 
ton, a native of Sparta, Georgia 
and attendants, Mrs. Velma 
Zeiler, native of Savannah, 
Georgia and Mrs. Florence Wells, 
native of Statesboro, Georgia. 
These young ladies are repre- 
sentatives of the Washington, 
D. C. Chapter of Savannah State 
College National Alumni. 




Mr. W. H. McBride, 1949 gradu- 
ate of Savannah State College, 
President of Savannah State 
College National Alumni Associ- 
ation; teacher, in Athens, 
Georgia. 




The Savannah Chapter Queen and attendants of Savannah State College 
National Alumni Association. Miss Barbara Green, Mrs. Margaret J. 
Washington (Miss Savannah Chapter), and Pearl Singleton. Mrs. Wash- 
ington and Miss Singleton are employed by the Board of Education of 
Screven and Chatham County. Miss Green is employed by the 
Federal Government. 



THE SALUTATION OF THE DAWN 

Listen to the Exhortation of the Dawn. 

Look to this Day, for it is Life — 

The very Life of Life 

In its brief course lie all the verities 

And Realities of your Existence: 

The Bliss of Growth, 

The Glory of Action 

The Splendor of Beauty; 

For yesterday is but a Dream, 

And To-morrow is only a Vision; 

But To-Day well-lived 

Makes every yesterday a Dream of 

Happiness, 
And every To-Morrow a Vision of 

Hope .... 

Unknown 




■'?-., 





The former Miss Alna Ford, a| 
1954 graduate of Savannah State! 
College is the wife of Mr. W. D. 
Kent, Jr., and she is presently 
teaching at William James High 
School in Statesboro, Georgia. 
Mrs. Kent is indicative of the 
aurora of prosperity exemplified 
by the sons and daughters of 
dear "Ole S.S.C." 



Prince A. Jackson, Jr., 
Alumni Secretary 



14 





Ir. William Wood, graduate of 1955, being congratulated by 
)r. Anderson, chairman of division of Business Administra- 
ion. Mr. Wood was appointed as accountant of United States 
Custom House of Atlanta, Georgia. 



Unstable dream, according to thy place, 

Be steadfast once, or else at least be true. 
By tasted sweetness make me not to rue 

The sudden loss of thy false feigned grace. 
By good respect, in such a dangerous case. 

Thou broughtest not her into this tossing 
mew, 
But madest my sprite live my care to renew, 

My body in tempest her succor to embrace. 
The body dead, the sprite had his desire. 

Painless was the one; the other in delight. 
Why then, alas, did it not keep it right, 

Returning to leap into the fire? 
And where it was at, wish it could not remain; 

Such mocks of dreams they turn to deadly 
pain. 

Anonymous 



Mrs. F r a n k i e Gross 
stevens is a '51 gradu- 
ite of Savannah State 
College. She received 
ler graduate training 
r o m Northwestern 
Jniversity in 1954. She 
ilso is a teacher at 
William James High 
school in Statesboro, 
Georgia. 



Vlrs. Maggie J. Redwine 
s a graduate of Savan- 
nah State College and 
i teacher at the Julia 
Pearl Bryant Elemen- 
tary School in States- 
boro, Georgia. 





Mrs. Thelma D. Walker, 
1952 graduate of Sa- 
vannah State. She is a 
mathematics teacher at 
Henderson High and 
Elementary School, and 
President of Randolph 
County Teachers 
Association. 




B. B. White, Director, 
Monroe Area Voca- 
tional and Technical 
School, Albany, 
Georgia. 



(oX^QQ 



15 



COMMITTEE ON HOMECOMING ACTIVITIES 



Frank Tharpe, Chairman; Eddie Bivins, Vice 
Chairman; Mrs. Geraldine Abernathy, Felix 
Alexis, Mrs. Martha Avery, Leroy Brown, M. 
Dixon, Arthur Dwight, Mrs. Ella Fisher, J. Ran- 
dolph Fisher, Samuel Gill, Phillip Hampton, Eu- 
gene Jackson, Miss Yvonne McGlockton, Mrs. 
Luetta Milledge, Prince Mitchell, Mrs. Mobley, 
Robert Pindar, Wiley A. Perdue, Wilton C. Scott, 
Willie G. Tucker, John L. Wilson, Miss Delores 
Bowens, Paul Buchanan, Miss Elease David, Miss 
Idella Glover, Charles Hall, Miss Audrey Hunter, 
Clyde Jenkins, Miss Carolyn Quillion, Miss Jessie 
Scott, David Street, Ithamus Studgeon, Miss Lucy 
White, and Charles Wright. 





Frank Tharpe 
General Chairman 



Eddie Bivins 
Vice Chairman 



16 




Library — The Center of Instructional Programs 



To-night, grave sir, both my poor house and I 

Do equally desire your company; 
Not that we think us worthy such a guest, 

But that your worth will dignify our feast 
With those that come, whose grace may make 

that seem 
Something, which else could hope for no esteem. 

Of this we will sup free, but moderately. 

And we will have no polly, or parrot by; 
Nor shall our cups make any guilty men, 

But at our parting we will be as when 
We innocently met. No simple word 

That shall be uttered at our mouthful board 
Shall make us sad next morning, or affright 

The liberty that we'll enjoy to-night. 

Ben Jonson 










TTT 

11 



STATE 
COLLEGE 
ULLETIN 



H±'|*M 



INFORMATION 
ISSUE 



A VAN N AH, GEORGIA 




^ 





















1 



\ 





Savannah State College Embarks on an Era of Expansion 



r. Howard Jordan, 
Jr., President of 
Savannah State 
College, and his 
family. 



Rapid progress is being made at the College in developing a building program 
which will provide additional modern facilities for the prosecution of a sound and 
well-rounded, educational program for all of our students. The Board of Regents of 
the University System has authorized the following additions to the physical plant 
at the College: 

1. A dormitory, presently under construction, to house 100 women students will 
be ready for occupancy in September, 1964. This two-story brick building will be 
constructed at a cost of approximately $280,000. It will include grooming rooms 
for beauty culture, a snack kitchen, a laundrette, and a combination room for 
lounging, reception and recreation. Two young ladies will be housed to a room. 

2. Another dormitory for 180 young women at a cost of approximately $520,000 
will be constructed on Taylor Road, south of Powell Hall and west of the new dormi- 
tory for women now being built; it is planned for occupancy in September, 1965. 

3. A two-story, air-.conditioned classroom building at a cost of approximately 
$425,000 is in the final stages of planning, and will be built on Taylor Road, south 
of the Technical Science Building across the street from Powell Hall. This plant will 
consist of 15 classrooms, data processing facilities, a language laboratory, a reading 
clinic, and an administration area with office space for 33 instructors. 

4. A four-unit, all weather, lighted tennis court is being erected adjacent to the 
athletic field. 

5. A $400,000 annex to Wiley Gymnasium. This new physical education facility 
will consist of a swimming pool, classrooms, and additional spectator seating for 
indoor sports. 

The above listed facilities along with the facilities already available at Savannah 
State College will provide the students and faculty with a desirable environment for 
greater learning activities. 

Savannah State College is dedicated to the development of thorough and sound 
programs which will prepare its graduates to meet the needs of the competitive age 
in which we live, and which we all face in the future. 

The College now includes six divisions and 14 departments which gives students 
a wide variety of courses from which to select. The major divisions are Business 
Administration, Education, Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences and Tech- 
nical Sciences. Through the offerings of these divisions, students may prepare for 
varied careers in the areas of art, modern foreign languages, English and literature, 
biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics, physical education, home economics, 
music, history, economics, sociology, political science, engineering technology, and 
industrial education. 

Savannah State College is located near the large and interesting city of Savannah. 
It is the philosophy of the College to be actively involved in all community activities 
which are designed to develop better community living. 

We invite high school graduates to join us in the pursuit of excellence in the 
disciplines offered at the College. 

HOWARD JORDAN, JR., 

President 



DATES FOR THE 
ADMINISTERING OF TESTS 

College Entrance Examination Board 

March 7, May 2, July 8, 1964 

Graduate Record Examination 

April 25, 1964 



The Savannah State College Bulletin 

President Dr. Howard W. Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations and 

Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Scott 

Issue Editor Carolyn R. Screen 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Volume XVII March, 1964 Number 4 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly 
in October, December, February, March, April, and May 
by Savannah State College. Second Class mail privileges 
authorized at Savannah, Georgia. 



-n 






t 








Savannah State College . . . 
THE CURRICULUM 

Savannah State College is located off Taylor Road 
and Falligant Avenue, in the historic city of Savannah. 
Georgia, which is the oldest city and chief seaport of 
the state, as well as the first capitol. 

The campus, comprising one hundred and thirty-six 
acres, presents a setting of matchless natural beauty. 
Among the more outstanding buildings are Camilla 
Hubert Hall, Adams Hall, and Meldrim Hall, consisting 
of administrative offices, the auditorium, and classrooms. 

There are several new buildings on the campus which 
include: A million dollar technical science building; a 
half-million dollar library; Wiley Gymnasium, which is 
annexed to Willcox Gymnasium; Richard R. Wright Hall; 
a sewage disposal system, and a heating plant. 

The science building has been remodeled, and the 
College has a language laboratory equipped with various 
types of machines, and a reading clinic with modern 
facilities. Hill Hall has been remodeled and now houses 
a beautiful center, post office, snack bar. bookstore, the 
offices of Student Personnel Services, and Testing and 
Guidance. Morgan Hall has been remodeled and houses 
the business department. The College Infirmary, a modern 
eighteen-bed structure provides for students who require 
treatment or confinement for minor illness, has also been 
remodeled. 

The Intellectual Center 
of the Campus 

The library of a college is one of its most prized 
possessions. The adequacy of its resources and the nature 
of its services to students and faculty largely determine 
the quality of the academic program. On the Savannah 
State College campus, the library is an indispensable unit 
which undergirds the instructional program as well as 
contributes to the recreational reading interests. The 
library is not an adjunct to teaching but the heart of the 
learning process. 

The library staff and faculty are busy assembling a 
notable book collection to be used in active support of 
the academic curriculum. Assembling a book collection 
is not enough! The librarian and his staff actively en- 
courage students to use books with an emphasis on the 
role that books play in the intellectual life of the academic 
community. The resources of the library include 45.000 
volumes, several-thousand pamphlets, 522 periodicals and 
22 newspapers. The London Times, the New York Times, 
the Savannah Morning Neivs, and the Savannah Evening 
Press, are on microfilm. 

"Let's Listen to a Story," hour under the direction of 
Miss Althea Williams. Circulation Librarian, is held weekly 
for the children of the community. Dr. Samuel Johnson 
said, "Those who do not read can have nothing to think 
and little to say.*' Since Dr. Johnson is highly regarded 
in our community, a Great Books Discussion Group, 
under the sponsorship of the library has been organized 
to encourage people to read and meet together to dis- 
cuss great books. 

R. W. Gadsden, a retired educator, and E. J. Josey, 
Librarian, are the co-leaders of the group. Exhibitions of 
paintings by some of the world's great artists are dis- 



played in the library periodically. A recently inaugurated 
lecture series has truly made the library a market place 
of ideas. 

All in all, the library of Savannah State College is an 
essential instrument in the life of the academic community. 

The Curriculum 

The formal instructional program of Savannah State 
College comprises the general curriculum, areas of major 
and minor concentration, and terminal curricula. The 
program is organized within these seven divisions: 

THE DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

THE DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

Department of Elementary Education 
Department of Secondary Education 
Department of Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation 

THE DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

Department of English 
Department of Fine Arts 
Department of Modern Languages 

THE DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 
Department of Biology 
Department of Chemistry 
Department of Mathematics and Physics 

THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

THE DIVISION OF TECHNICAL SCIENCES 

Department of Home Economics 
Department of Industrial Technology 

the division of home study 
The General Curriculum 

The General Education Program proposes to provide 
opportunities for all students to acquire the basic 
skills, attitudes, habits, appreciations and understandings 
requisite for the good life. 

It seeks to guarantee to all students competency in 
communication and thinking. It further proposes to orient 
students toward and to sensitize them to human and 
universal good and to the worth and dignity of every 
human being. 

At this college, the general curriculum is preoccupied 
with the major disciplines that: 

1. Acquaint the students with broad areas of knowl- 
edge and human experience; 

2. Give them an understanding of themselves, their 
culture and physical environments; 

3. Provide the students with a sound intellectual and 
moral foundation upon which character and pro- 
fessional and vocational opportunities may rest. 

The program is concerned generally with freshman 
and sophomore students. However, some attention is 
devoted to students on the junior and senior level of their 
intellectual maturation. In this respect, general education 
is an integral phase of the experience of all students who 
matriculate for a degree at the College. 

The General Education Program is under the general 
supervision of the General Education Committee and the 
Coordinator of General Education. The Committee con- 
sists of students and faculty members. 



Division of Business Administration 

A high school student who is preparing for a career in business 
via the college route should direct his efforts toward becoming pro- 
ficient in mathematics and English at the high school level. Proficiency 
in mathematics allows him to make quick use of quantitative tools in 
solving business problems. Proficiency in English permits him to 
communicate his ideas. The ability to do both are significant at- 
tributes of business personnel. 

Though not essential, since the college offers the necessary funda- 
mentals, a student may also take such courses as bookkeeping, short- 
hand, and other business subjects which are offered at his respective 
high school. Since more and more high school students are arriving 
at college with typing skills, it is recommended that a course in type- 
writing be taken. 

One of the advantages of majoring in business is that one is pre- 
paring himself for a wide variety of employment possibilities. Oppor- 
tunities exist for self-employment, for employment in private industry, 
and for employment with the government — national, state and local. 

Some positions, for which training in business at Savannah State 
College is designed to prepare students include: 

Entrepreneurs Secretaries 

Accountants Stenographers 

Bookkeepers Typists 

Salesmen Business Managers 

Economists Teachers of Business 

To realize the aims of a person desiring training in business. 
Savannah State College's Division of Business offers courses leading 
to the degree of bachelor of science and a terminal, two-year program 
leading to a certificate of proficiency. 

A student who pursues a degree in business at this institution may 
concentrate his efforts in one of the following areas: (f) General 
Business Administration. (2) Accounting, a student may find a 
challenging career in the field of accounting if he has analytical 
ability, if he has a facility with figures, and if he desires personal 
enjoyment while doing work which requires the use of these attributes. 

Because of the numerous job opportunities that exist currently for 

Accountants, students should become familiar with the attributes of 

successful accountants as well as the nature of the job opportunities 
that are available. 

(3) Economics, (4) Secretarial Science, and (5) The Program 
for Teachers of Business and Distributive Education. 

These curricula also become the bases for advanced study. 



Division of Education 

The Division of Education at Savannah State College is a member 
of the Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. It offers twelve 
curricula in teacher preparation and a program of basic training for 
teacher-librarians. These programs are approved by the State Depart- 
ment of Education. This means that satisfactory completion of any 
program brings automatic certification in the field of study pursued. 

A person majoring in Education at Savannah State College is the 
concern of every division and department of the College, therefore, 
the resources and facilities — as well as the interests and efforts of the 
entire institution, are at his disposal. 

Aside from a strong academic classroom program in general, 
specialized, and professional education, the teaching major at Savan- 
nah State College has rich, varied, and meaningful laboratory experi- 
ences which brings one into constant contact with children and youth. 




jVpy^H jfM^. 









COLLEGE-WIDE PROVISION FOR 
TEACHER EDUCATION 

This Division comprises three departments: the Department of 
Elementary Education; the Department of Health. Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation; and the Department of Secondary Education. 
The preparation of teachers is, however, a college-wide commitment. 
Because every division and department at the College is involved in 
training teachers in some subject matter field, this function engages 
the constant interest and efforts, staff resources, and facilities of the 
entire institution. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 

The essential aim of the Department of Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation is to afford professional training for pre-service and 
in-service teachers of health, physical education, and recreation in the 
elementary and secondary schools. A parallel aim is advisement. The 
Department encourages only potentially training in this field. A third 
aim is to provide for all students instruction in the basic principles 
of health and recreational activity needed for wholesome living. 

In pursuance of the foregoing aims, this Department provides a 
four-fold program of instruction. For students who plan to become 
professional workers in the field of health, physical education, and 
recreation — either in schools or in other agencies — the department 
offers a sequence of specialized training leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Education, with a concentration in health. 
physical education, and recreation. 

In addition, for all students enrolled in teacher education curricula 
at Savannah State College, this department provides basic training in 
supervision of one or more phases of a comprehensive health, physical 
education, and recreation program in the schools of Georgia. This 
phase of the work is provided either in selected specialized courses 
or in a minor sequence. Further, for all students enrolled at the 
college this department provides instruction in the fundamental con- 
cepts and activities of health, physical education, and recreation as 
an essential phase of general education. 

Finally, this department serves the college community through 
instruction and leadership in the intramural program. The intramural 
program is, in effect, a laboratory in which students enjoy practicing 
the skills learned in general service courses and relish competing with 
their peers. 



Division of Hltmanities 

The Division of Humanities, as its name implies, is concerned 
primarily with transforming the individual into a human and humane 
person. The technique for realizing this aim is that of serious study 
of the human heritage as it has been recorded in literature, music, 
art, and philosophy. In this manner the student deepens his ap- 
preciation, sharpens his intellect, enhances his critical powers, and 
incorporates himself in the mainstream of the best that has been 
thought and felt. 

The Division of Humanities provides opportunities for majoring in 
English, Music, the Fine Arts, French, and Spanish. The curricula 
in these areas are designed also to prepare teachers. Thus students 
who elect to teach become purveyors of the humanistic tradition. The 
College provides a means also for meeting the national need for 
persons trained in foreign languages. As future linguists and/or 
teachers, students have an unusual opportunity at Savannah State 
College. A strong faculty in modern languages in addition to a 
recently installed laboratory assures the students the means of 
thoroughly preparing themselves in this area. 




MUSIC 

In the area of music, the Department of Fine Arts at 
Savannah Slate College offers a major program leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education 
and two minor programs — one for prospective teachers 
in the secondary schools and a nonteaching program. All 
of the curricula have been approved by the three national 
accrediting agencies — The Music Teachers National As- 
sociation, the National Association of Schools of Music 
and the Music Educators National Conference, as well as 
by the State Board of Certification and the Board of 
Regents of the University System of Georgia. 

Courses include intensive work in theory, history and 
literature, performance, applied music, conducting and 
music education. Although 75 hours are required for 
state certification, a total of 87 hours constitutes the four- 
year music requirement at the College. Previous training 
of at least two years in any applied area is required of 
all prospective majors, but skilled aptitude is recognized 
and accepted in lieu of this requirement if necessary. All 
majors must pursue four years of training in piano, voice, 
or another instrument as well as the same amount of time 
in their applied major area. In addition to the music- 
courses, all candidates for a degree take a large comple- 
ment of courses in general education and the professional 
sequences. 

The five musical organizations — The Marching Band. 
The Concert Band, The Choral Society. The Women's Glee 
Club and The Men's Glee Club — are each directed by a 
full-time faculty member and provide ample opportunity 
for students inside and outside of the department to re- 
ceive experiences in public performance which range 
from programs on the campus at assemblies, church 
services, vespers, and special programs, to local television 



appearances, concerts in the community, athletic games 
away from home, and concert tours throughout the state 
and the eastern section of the country. Each organization, 
furthermore, contains special skills in each area, thus 
providing additional opportunities for specialized training. 

One of the most important operations in this depart- 
ment is the awarding each year of a number of scholar- 
ships, called grants-in-aid, which are given to capable, 
worthy applicants in all organizations upon recommenda- 
tion of the department. Depending upon the aptitude, 
academic standing, and financial need of the student, 
these awards are sufficient at times to provide tuition for 
a full year. Grants are made, however, only to applicants 
who file the necessary forms, are recommended by the 
department, and are approved by the Committee on 
Scholarships. Recipients, encouraged to apply in the 
spring, are usually notified during the summer, well in 
advance of the opening of the Fall Quarter. 

As for musical facilities, the department occupies 
three buildings throughout the campus; and because of 
the increasing enrollment of music major, these build- 
ings are fully utilized for classes, organizational rehearsals, 
practice periods, and office space. Pianos are provided 
tor practice, and rooms are available for other instru- 
mental and voice practice without charge. Band instru- 
ments are provided without charge to all band students 
who need them : and complete uniforms, robes, stoles, 
blazers, and concert dresses are available to members of 
the various organizations. 

For any additional information concerning the music 
area of the Department of Fine Arts, please feel free to 
address your inquiries to Dr. Coleridge A. Braithwaite, 
Chairman, Department of Fine Arts, Savannah State 
College. 





A CAREER IN ART CAN HAVE 

MANY REWARDS 

The rewards can be great for a person with or without 
"artistic talent." To gain these rewards, one needs only 
the desire to learn and a good place in which to learn. 
The Art Department at Savannah State College provides 
students with an adequate environment for learning. If 
one has the desire, then he can progress at Savannah 
State College. 

The Art Department is located in new quarters, 
especially designed and equipped with modern studios 
and lecture rooms being brought up-to-date, making it 
possible to teach the latest use of books and methods in 
lithography, etching, serigraphy, ceramics, sculpture, and 
painting. 

Students who have studied art at Savannah State 
College have reaped many rewards. Some have won 
large sums of money in art competition. Some are en- 
joying the success of exhibiting their art at qualified 
galleries. One former student is in the Pentagon in Wash- 
ington, D. C, where he is using the knowledge of art 
acquired here. Others have successful careers as teachers 
of art. And, still others have gone on to more advanced 
studies in schools throughout the country. 

Art students at Savannah State College occasionally 
have opportunities of getting first-hand experience, as a 
number of art jobs of short duration come into the Art 
Department. There are some jobs of a more permanent 
nature waiting to be filled. 

The Art Department is prepared and eager to help 
students in many ways. The rewards can be plentiful 
for those who are seeking; and when they acquire a 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Art Education, they will 
find that rewards other than salary, position, dignity or 
fame await them. They may learn, ultimately, to enrich 
their lives with things which do not pass so quickly; for, 
to know and to be able to enjoy knowing is indeed a 
divine reward. 

Department of 
Modern Languages 

The Department of Modern Languages offers instruc- 
tion in three languages: French, German and Spanish. 
The primary aim of the members of the Department is to 
teach the student to understand, speak, read and write 
these languages so that he may communicate with others 
who speak them. This instruction is carried on in daily 
recitations in the classroom and also in a modern fifteen- 
booth laboratory where the student can increase his pro- 
ficiency by listening to and repeating exercises of various 
types especially prepared for this purpose. For students 
who wish to develop more than an elementary proficiency 
in French or Spanish, the Department offers courses 
leading to a minor in either language. It also offers lead- 
ing courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Education with a concentration either in French or 
Spanish. 

Outside of the field of education, a person with a 
major in a foreign language can find employment in 
several areas. First, there is the area of organizations 
of more or less international character. Because of the 
nature of its work, there is almost a constant demand at 
the United Nations Headquarters for men and women 
who are proficient in foreign languages. 




Division of Natural Sciences 

The Division of Natural Sciences is proud of the record that it 
has made in helping young people find themselves in the scientific 
and mathematical world during the last quarter of a century. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

The aims of the Department of Biology are ( 1 ) to provide for all 
students that knowledge which is essential to an understanding of the 
biological basis of living; (2) to train persons adequately through 
the media of advanced courses for entry into the professional study 
of dentistry, medicine, and nursing; (3) to prepare persons to teach 
the biological sciences in the secondary school or to continue study 
on the graduate level. 

In addition to the required general courses, this department offers 
courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science with a major 
in biology. This department offers also a minor. 

The Biology Department is proud of its achievements during the 
last several years. It takes great pride in reviewing the records of 
some of its graduates. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

The Department of Chemistry has grown by leaps and bounds in 
the past few years. The teaching staff, teaching space and equipment 
have been increased one hundred per cent. 

The Department has been quite successful in obtaining funds from 
Chemical Societies and the National Science Foundation to sponsor 
several significant programs such as the In-Service Institute for 
teachers of Chemistry and General Science in secondary education 
and the Summer Science Program for selected high school students. 

Many research projects are carried out by the students in coopera- 
tion with the department's active research program. The Depart- 
ment feels that research projects serve as good preparation for more 
highly developed and specialized research that the students will en- 
counter in graduate school. The research program serves as an outlet 
of expression of the student's scientific interest and capabilities other 
than in the classroom and gives him experience in employing the 
scientific method in problem solving. 

The Department of Chemistry provides basic training for higher 
education — work leading to the Master of Science and Ph.D. degree. 
In addition to this it provides all of the chemistry needed in pre- 
nursing, pre-dental and pre-medical education. 

The curriculum has been revised so that the student will receive 
a substantial number of courses in mathematics, physics and biology 
which will aid him in becoming a better Chemist. 

The Department believes in creativity, freedom of exploration, 
productivity, hard work and recreation. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS 

The Mathematics curriculum and courses are being continually 
revised to keep in step with the recommendations released by the 
School Mathematics Study Group in 1960. The textbooks, course out- 
lines, and other materials are continuously being changed in order 
to meet today's challenge. The Physics courses are designed to give 
emphasis to the PSSC recommendations for college Physics. 

The objectives of the department are not only to prepare better 
teachers of Mathematics and Physics, but also to provide them with 
the courses necessary to do further study in areas like linear pro- 
gramming and computing, statistical research, electronic, guided 
missile, engineering, mathematics for various phases of industry re- 
search, actuary science, and over twenty branches of governmental 
service. 




10 




Division of Social Sciences 

The Division of Social Sciences offers two major programs for 
persons interested in the social sciences. Curriculum I leads to the 
B.S. degree in the social sciences with a concentration in history. 
Curriculum II leads to the B.S. degree in the social sciences with a 
concentration in sociology leading to the professional study of social 
work. 

Persons who plan to teach social studies in the secondary school 
should enroll in the Teach Education Program and pursue the B.S. 
degree in Education with a concentration in the social sciences. 

Curriculum I is designed for persons interested in careers in: law, 
government, diplomatic service, general research, Young Men's 
Christian Association, and Urban League work. 

Curriculum II is designed for persons interested in careers as 
social workers, probation officers, vocational counselors., camp coun- 
selors, employment interviewers, juvenile court workers, welfare fund 
workers, and immigration service workers. 

Division of Technical Sciences 

The Division of Technical Sciences encompasses instructional 
programs in engineering technology, home economics, and industrial 
teacher education which are organized in two departments; namely, 
the Department of Engineering Technology and the Department of 
Home Economics. These departments afford opportunities for students 
to pursue curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science with 
majors in foods and nutrition and institutional management, textiles 
and clothing, building construction technology, electronics technology, 
mechanical technology, industrial arts education; trade and industrial 
education. The latter two teacher education programs are offered in 
cooperation with the Division of Education. 

A major portion of the offerings of the Division of Technical 
Sciences is designed to prepare persons for immediate employment 
in the industrial world as professional and semi-professional workers 
in the technical home economics and engineering technology. In- 
dividuals interested in careers in these areas should be well grounded 
in the applied sciences. Such high school subjects as physics, algebra, 
plane geometry, trigonometry and industrial shop are very desirable 
for persons planning to pursue engineering technology curricula, and 
chemistry is essential for those interested in technical home economics. 

The Division of Technical Sciences offers the required shop work 
and special subject preparation for students who plan to teach indus- 
trial arts education, or trade and industrial education. The industrial 
arts education program does not attempt to prepare persons for suc- 
cessful employment in industry as skilled or semi-skilled workers, but 
provides a variety of industrial shop activities augmented by ap- 
propriate general and professional education courses leading io 
competence in industrial arts teaching at the secondary level. The 
trade and industrial education program is designed for those persons 
wishing to teach trade and industrial subjects on a vocational basis in 
the secondary schools. In order to pursue this program successfully, 
one must have already learned a trade and worked in industry for 
two years as a journeyman at the trade he wishes to teach. 

Engineering technology is an area of knowledge embracing those 
phases of physical sciences, mathematics, and the practices of modern 
industry which are utilized in the design and manufacture of the 
machines, structures, power sources, communication systems and 
materials needed to maintain a highly civilized society. The activities 
of engineering technology are concerned with translating the concepts 
and theories of professional engineers and scientists into actual devices 
and products by using laboratory tests to provide data for rational 
designs. These tests are followed by interpretations of data and the 
preparation of working drawings for the use of the skilled craftsmen 
that produce the devices and products. 



11 



The Department of Engineering Technology offers 
curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, 
with majors in building construction, electronics, and 
mechanical technology. 

The curriculum in building construction technology is 
designed to provide ample instruction in those areas of 
knowledge required for successful performance in these 
capacities: (1) architectural and structural draftsman and 
designer, (2) construction surveyor. (3) estimator, (4) 
materials tester. 

The electronics technology curriculum provides in- 
struction in the fundamental of vacuum tube and semi- 
conductor of circuit theory with emphasis on the applica- 
tions of theoretical principles to actual electronics devices. 
Graduates of the electronics technology sequence are pre- 
pared to function in these positions: ( f ) electronics drafts- 
man. (2) research analyst, (3) communications technician. 

The mechanical technology curriculum provides an 
opportunity for a student to receive comprehensive engi- 
neering experiences which will enable him to design ma- 
chinery and to prepare working drawings of the same for 
industry. A graduate of the mechanical technology pro- 
gram is qualified to assume the responsibilities of these 
positions: (f) machine designer, (2) mechanical drafts- 
man, (3) automotive technician. 

The home economics program is directed toward two 
major objectives. The first of these is to enhance the 
general education of the student through a core curriculum 
for common learning. The core curriculum has three 
aims: (1) development of the student as a person, (2) 
preparation for family life, and (3) preparation for the 
responsibilities of citizenship in its broadest sense. The 
second major objective is preparation of the student to 
enter and advance assurance and competence in one of 
the various professions in home economics. 



The Division of Home Study 

The Division of Home Study encompasses instructional 
programs in Business Administration, Economics, Edu- 
cation, English, Geography, Government, History, Humani- 
ties, Mathematics, Psychology, Social Science, and 
Sociology. These courses are offered for those persons 
who are interested in furthering their education, but are 
unable to do so in residence. 

The Home Study Department is authorized to operate 
the following programs: 

f. College Correspondence Study 
2. Extension Classes 

There are students enrolled in these courses living in 
all parts of Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, and Ala- 
bama; and we have students registered from New York, 
New Jersey, Washington, D. C. 

The Home Study Department is directed toward two 
objectives: The first is to provide a service for those 
persons who cannot undertake residence instruction, and 
the second is to provide an enriching program for those 
who do not require residence instruction for personal 
growth and enrichment. 

Extension classes are provided upon sufficient demand. 

For information concerning credit, fees, examinations, 
textbooks, etc., you may write to: The Division of Home 
Study, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia. 




: ;->'.-A --'-.: 





12 





Activities 

Savannah State College puts great emphasis upon a 
rich and varied religious life program. Ihrough its re- 
ligious activities, the College seeks to develop an under- 
standing of and an appreciation for the place of religion 
in everyday living, to deepen spiritual insight, and io 
make the practice of Christian principle a vital part of 
the life of the well educated citizen. 

Religious life activities are directed by the College 
Minister. The Sunday School, YMCA and YWCA, the 
Newman Club, and the annual Religious Emphasis Week 
provide opportunities for religious growth and develop- 
ment under the supervision of the Religious Life Com- 
mittee. 

Savannah State College contributes to the attainment 
of a well-rounded education by providing many oppor- 
tunities for students to participate in a wide range of 
significant activities. Through the efforts of organized 
groups, programs are planned for the social, religious, 
and cultural advancement of the college community. 

The Student Council, composed of representatives of 
all classes, works with the administration in the govern- 
ment of the College. It works also with the various campus 
organizations and sponsors projects for the general wel- 
fare of the student body. 

The Tigers Roar, official student newspaper, is pub- 
lished every six weeks by students under the supervision 
of the Public Relations Office. 

The following organizations also provide media for 
expression of student interests: Art Club, Business Club, 
Camera Club, Collegiate Counselors, Creative Dance 
Group, Debating Club, Dormitory Councils, Economics 
Club, Newman Club, Savannah State College Players 
Guild, Social Science Club, Student Loan Association, 
Tiger's Roar, Trade Association, Usher's Club, Varsity 
Club, Future Teachers of America (NEA), Home Eco- 
nomics Club, Veterans Club, YMCA, YWCA, and the 
Women's Council. 

The following national social fraternities are organized 
on the campus: Alpha Phi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Phi 
Beta Sigma, and Kappa Alpha Psi. 

The following national social sororities are organized 
on the campus: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Sigma Gamma Rho, 
Zeta Phi Beta, and Delta Sigma Theta. 

The national honor societies, Alpha Kappa Mu and 
Betta Kappa Chi, have chapters on the campus. 

The Department of Health and Physical Education 
conducts a well-rounded intramural athletic program of 
seasonal activities for men and for women. Utilizing 
group games and various sports for their full educational 
and health values, the program features football, basket- 
ball, track and field hockey, and badminton. 

A member of the Southeastern Athletic Conference, 
Savannah State College maintains competition in all sports 
sponsored by the conference. 

The College also holds membership in two national 
athletic associations. NCAA and NAIA. 

To complement formal education on the campus, the 
college provides many activities for cultural enrichment. 
Student assemblies, institutes, motion pictures, lectures, 
art exhibitions, dramatics, forums, athletic contests, hobby 
groups, and tours contribute to the general welfare of 
the community. 



13 




Admission Information 

Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who 
present evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, 
sound health, and interest in a specific course of study 
are eligible for admission to the several departments of 
the College. 

FORMAL APPLICATION REQUIRED 

Each candidate for admission is required to make 
formal application and thereafter submit such credentials 
as may be needed to support the application. Admissions 
correspondence should be addressed to the Director of 
Admissions, Savannah State College, State College Branch, 
Savannah, Georgia. 

Transcripts and recommendations should be mailed 
directly from the applicant's former school to the Director 
of Admissions. The application form with instructions 
may be obtained by writing the Director of Admissions. 
Inquiries should be made immediately. 

ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 

NOTE: Fees remitted by mail should be sent by 

money order, cashiers check or certified check payable 

to SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE. 

"Per Quarter * Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $ 60.00 $180.00 

Health Fee 3.00 9.00 

Student Activity Fee 10.00 30.00 

Student Group Insurance 5.00 15.00 

Total Charges— Day Student $ 78.00 $234.00 

Room, Board and Laundry 187.00 561.00 

Total Charges — 

Boarding Students * $265.00 * $795.00 

* Freshmen and Entering Students pay an additional 
$10.00 General Deposit required of all students upon initial 
registration in any unit of the University System. In 
keeping with the vote of the student body in May, 1962, 
each student will be assessed a $6.00 Yearbook Fee due 
and payable at Fall Quarter Registration or the student's 



initial registration. Please refer to the current college 
catalogue for a complete schedule of fees. 

The above table includes basic fees only. Other 
charges are assessed where applicable. All charges are 
subject to change at the end of each quarter. 

Normal cost of books and supplies approximate $30.00 
per quarter. Students are required to secure all books, 
supplies and tools necessary for satisfactory completion 
of courses for which they are enrolled. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registra- 
tion. Students are required to meet their financial obliga- 
tions promptly as condition of their remaining in college. 
Students granted scholarships or work-aid will be notified 
in writing and credit will be made to their accounts 
accordingly. 

Veterans coming to Savannah State College should 
bring with them sufficient funds to pay all fees as in- 
dicated on the Schedule of Fees. 

SELF HELP OPPORTUNITIES 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet 
college expenses through part-time employment, provided 
they maintain satisfactory scholastic averages. These 
work opportunities include such jobs as clerical and 
stenographic work, library work, waiting tables, washing 
dishes, pantry and kitchen work, skilled and unskilled 
work in the several trades and in maintenance. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

A limited number of special scholarships are available 
to selected students who meet the required standards of 
scholastic merit, high character, general promise, and 
superior achievement in certain specific areas of the 
college program. 

The aim of the National Defense Student Loan Pro- 
gram is to create at American Colleges and Universities 
loan funds from which needy students may borrow to 
complete their higher education. Students interested in 
National Defense Loan Funds, should write Chairman of 
Student Personnel Service, Savannah State College, Savan- 
nah, Georgia. 



14 




15 



'• 






'0*£; 



ft- j 




Savannah State College Alumna 
Regional Teacher of the Year 

Once more, a Savannah State College Alumna has been 
named "Teacher of the Year" for Region 11. Mrs. Mazie 
W. Robinson, a Home Economics teacher at Scott Junior 
High School, has received this distinctive honor, and thereby 
symbolizes all teachers in the seventeen counties of Region 11. 
This recent honor comes as a result of Mrs. Robinsons having 
been chosen "Teacher of the Year" by the faculty of Scott 
Junior High School and Chatham County Teachers Asso- 
ciation. 

Mrs. Robinson has rendered many noteworthy services to 
local, state, and national professional organizations. She is 
the chairman of the social committee of Chatham County 
Teachers Association, chairman of the ninth grade Home- 
making Curriculum Planning Committee for the revision of 
the Homemaking curriculum for Chatham County, co-chair- 
man of Walter S. Scott P.T.A. Advisory committee, and an 
energetic advisor for the N.H.A. She has served on many 
statewide committees and presided over the general session 
at the last state vocational teachers convention. She was a 
voting delegate at the American Vocational Association con- 
vention which convened in Atlantic City, October 1963. 

She has exhibited genuine interest in the community and 
has displayed untiring efforts in community projects. These 
services include community projects dealing with family prob- 
lems, teaching classes for Red Cross and for the Chatham 
County Health Department, and fund raising drives for youth 
organizations. She is a member of St. Paul C.M.E. Church, 
and makes unique contributions to the church through the 
St. Paul C.M.E. Service Guild. 

Travel and educational tours of many states in our coun- 
try, Cuba, and Mexico serves as a background for adding 
color to the progressive teaching methods used by Mrs. Rob- 
inson. In January 1964, a poll made by an English class at 
Scott Junior High School showed that she received the high- 
est number of votes from students naming her the "Most 
Outstanding Teacher." 

Mrs. Robinson is a product of the local public schools, 
received her B.S. degree in Home Economics from Savannah 
State College and has done advanced study at Tuskegee and 
Stout State College. 

Mrs. Robinson is an ardent worker in the Savannah State 
College Alumni, having served on the social and homecoming 
committees. 



Editorial 

During the last seventeen years, Savannah State College 
has been guided by four different Presidents. Dr. Benjamin 
F. Hubert left the College in June of 1947, and was succeeded 
by Dr. James A. Colston. Dr. Colston left in August of 1949, 
and was succeeded by Dr. William K. Payne. Dr. Payne died 
in July of 1963, and was succeeded by Dr. Howard Jordan, 
Jr. (Actually, we have had five Presidents, because Dean of 
Faculty, Timothy C. Meyers, served as acting President for 
about three months while the Board of Regents was in the 
process of appointing Dr. Jordan.) 

During these seventeen years, the alumni of the college 
have been becoming more active and strengthening our 
alumni organization. Although we are stronger today than 
at any time in our organization's history, we do not have 
nearly ten percent of our alumni actively participating in our 
alumni organization. 

Why do Alumni neglect their Alma Mater? There have 
been many reasons given, and this alumni neglect is suffered 
by all colleges, from the outstanding Ivy Colleges down to 
the smallest of the extremely poor private colleges. Savannah 
State then, is no exception in this area. 

During the past seven months, we have seen an upward 
trend of alumni participation in our Alma Mater's affairs. 
There seems to be an entirely different kind of attitude 
towards our College, and Alumni are now working harder 
than ever before. The changes in organization to allow 
District units have proved to be a great unifying factor in 
the counties within 100 miles of the College. The actual 
organization of the other districts should really move us 
forward. The creation of the Office of the Executive Vice- 
President has helped the organization tremendously, and is 
being administered by one of our most capable alumni, Ben- 
jamin F. Lewis, "53." The individual Alumni Chapters are 
working harder and the leadership is becoming progressively 
younger. 

As we enter the "Howard Jordan, Jr." era of our Alma 
Mater, it seems that we are definitely on the march. Dr. 
Jordan is making every effort to push us forward, along with 
his administration. We are sure that the next few years will 
find us, not only strong, but far more generous than at any 
time in our history. We are sure that alumni everywhere 
will join the march, and help us move our Alma Mater 
forward. 

Pkince A. Jackson, Jr. 
Alumni Secretary 



4- 



Support Your 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The Savannah State College Bulletin 

President Dr. Howard W. Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations and 

Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Scott 

Alumni Secretary Prince A. Jackson 

Issue Editor Carolyn R. Screen 

Photographer Robert Mobley 



* 



Volume XVII 



May, 1964 



Number 6 



The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly in 
October, December, February, March, April, and May by Savannah 
State College. Second Class mail privileges authorized at Savannah, 
Georgia. 




GREETING 
TO ALUMNI 



/ wish to take this opportunity to sincerely thank the officers and 
members of the Alumni Association along with members of the administra- 
tion, faculty, and student body, for the warm reception and strong support 
which I, as your sixth President, have received in my first year in office at 
Savannah State College. With the enthusiastic spirit ivhich is evident among 
the alumni and the College family, it is certain that Savannah State College 
will move rapidly ahead in taking its rightful place among the leaders in 
the educational world. As we come to the close of our first year in office, 
we pledge to you our every effort toivards the development of a program 
of academic and extra-class excellence to which all alumni members and 
friends can look with pride. 

We especially want to thank the alumni for the generous support and 
contributions to our National Defense Education Act Scholarship Fund. 
Through this medium, the College will be able to offer greater assistance 
to young men and women in getting an education, ivhich they may otherwise 
not have been able to afford. 

Elsewhere in this Bulletin, you will note the status of our Building 
Program. I am happy to report that it is moving along according to schedule. 

Mrs. Jordan and Judy join me in wishing for all alumni, faculty, stu- 
dents, and friends the best of health and happiness during the summer vaca- 
tion. You have, with you always, our prayers and sincere good wishes. 

Howard Jordan, Jr. 
President 



TEACHERS OF THE YEAR 



Mr. John H. Myles 
Sol C. Johnson High School 

Mr. John H. Myles. an excellent 
teacher, a dedicated coach, and out- 
standing personality was selected 
"Teacher of the Year" at Sol C. John- 
son High School. 

Mr. Myles has an exceptional 
academic record, which includes the 
B.S. degree from Savannah State Col- 
lege, a M.S. degree from New York 
University, advanced and special study 
at Florida A. & M. University, and a 
Six- Year Certificate awarded by New 
York University and the Georgia State 
Department of Education. 

Previous teaching experiences of Mr. 
Myles include positions as teacher and 
head coach at Savannah State College, 
Florida N. I. & M. College, St. Au- 
gustine, Florida; and Haven Home 
School, Savannah. 

An ardent church and community 
worker, Mr. Myles is a member of 
Butler Presbyterian Church. His pro- 
fessional affiliations include, C.C.T.A., 
G.T.E.A., A.T.A.. N.E.A. and the Sa- 
vannah Coaches and Officials Associa- 
tion. 

The Savannah Coaches and Officials 
Association and the Southeastern Quar- 
terback Club, selected Mr. Myles as 
"Coach of the Year," for 1963-64. 

He is the son of Mrs. Eliza Myles, 
the husband of Mrs. Dora Sanders 
Myles, and the father of little Gina 
Lorraine Myles. 



motivated and inspired children to 
plunge full-speed into the learning 
operation. The Florance Street School 
faculty and principal, Mr. Norman B. 
Elmore, consider Miss Lowes brilliant 
career a compass to guide them in their 
venture in the teaching profession. 



Miss Julia A. Lowe 
Florance Street School 

Miss Julia A. Lowe, a fourth grade 
teacher, was selected "Teacher of the 
Year" at Florance Street School. Miss 
Lowe, a native of Savannah, received 
her earliest formal education in the 
public schools of this city. Her high 
school diploma was received from Spell- 
man College in Atlanta, Georgia. She 
was the recipient of the B.S. degree 
from Savannah State College and has 
studied further at Atlanta University. 

The honoree's church membership is 
with the First Congregation Church. 
She is affiliated with local, regional, 
state, and national educational organ- 
izations. 

Her years of teaching have been un- 
paralled in the propagation of wisdom. 
She has given unselfishly of her services, 
and through these services, effectively 



Mrs. Albertha M. Smith 
Sol C. Johnson High School 

Mrs. Albertha M. Smith is the 
"Teacher of the Year" at Sol. C. John- 
son Elementary School for 1964-65. 

Because of her educational training 
in the teaching profession, her sincere 
interest in students, academically, 
spiritually, and morally, these and other 
qualities contributed to Mrs. Smith's 
selection. 

A native of Savannah, Georgia, Mrs. 
Smith received her elementary and 
secondary education in the system she 
now serves. A bachelor of science de- 
gree was awarded her in elementary 
education from Savannah State Col- 
lege, and a master of arts degree was 
granted her from New York Univer- 
sity. Further study led her to Atlanta, 
John Carroll, and South Carolina State 
Universities. 

In addition to her classroom duties, 
she serves as advisor to the Safety 
Patrol, and Junior Jonquill Garden 
Club. She holds membership in the 
N.E.A.. A.T.A., G.T.E.A.. C.C.T.A., 
P.T.A. and Classroom Teachers. 

Mrs. Smith is an ardent community 
and church worker and she is a mem- 
ber of Saint Benedict's Catholic Church. 

She is the wife of Maurice Smith 
and the mother of two daughters, 
JoAnn Smith Smith and Minnie Ruth 
Smith Lockhart. 



Mrs. Virginia C. Floyd 
M. G. Haynes School 

Mrs. Virginia C. Floyd, second grade 
teacher, was selected by the faculty of 
M. G. Haynes School as their first 
"Teacher of the Year." Her sincerity, 
dignity, sense of humor, initiative and 
well-rounded personality have estab- 
lished her as being highly worthy of 
this honor. 

Mrs. Floyd is a product of the Sa- 
vannah public schools and Spellman 
College. She received her B.S. degree 
in Elementary Education from Georgia 



State College, now Savannah State 
College, and has done advanced study 
at Atlanta University. 

She holds membership in the follow- 
ing organizations: N.E.A., G.T.E.A., 
A.T.A., C.C.T.A., Classroom Teachers, 
and P.T.A. She is also affiliated with 
the Order of the Eastern Star, Y. W.C.A., 
Ladies Auxiliary of S.U.N. A., and Iota 
Lambda Sorority. 

She is an ardent member of the First 
Bryan Baptist Church, where she serves 
as chairman of the music department 
and organist of this historical church. 

In addition to her regular classroom 
duties, Mrs. Floyd serves as chairman 
of the school's music department, co- 
chairman of the school council, chair- 
man of the library club, and school rep- 
resentative of the liaison committee. 

She has used her extensive travel ex- 
periences and dedication to education 
for the continuous improvement of boys 
and girls. 



Mrs. Mattie Belle Collins 
Francis S. Barton School 

The principal and faculty of the 
Francis S. Barton School are very happy 
to acknowledge as their "Teacher of 
the Year" for 1963-64, Mrs. Mattie 
Belle Collins. 

Mrs. Collins, a fourth grade teacher, 
is a recipient of the B.S. degree in Ele- 
mentary Education from Savannah 
State College. She further enriched her 
educational background by attending 
summer sessions at Savannah State and 
by participation in several local work- 
shops sponsored by the Board of Edu- 
cation. 

Her professional affiliations include 
memberships in the N.E.A. , G.T.E.A., 
A.T.A., C.C.T.A., Classroom Teacher 
Association, P.T.A., and Savannah 
Chapter of the Savannah State College 
Alumni Association. 

She is a communicant of the Connor's 
Temple Baptist, and serves unselfishly 
in her religious obligations. For eleven 
years, she has taught in the public 
schools of Chatham County. 

Her pleasant smile, her delightful 
personality and a sincere liking for her 
pupils and associates are certainly at- 
tributes which helped her to attain the 
coveted title of Teacher of the Year. 




Mrs. Mary F. Simmons 
Anderson St. Elementary School 

Mrs. Mary F. Simmons is "Teacher 
of the Year" at Anderson Street Ele- 
mentary School. 

Mrs. Simmons is a native of Way- 
cross, Georgia, a 
graduate of Savan- 
nah State College, 
and at present, is 
doing graduate 
work at Tuskegee 
Institute. She also 
has attended many 
local summer work- 
shops. 

She is a member 
of the St. James 
A.M.E. Church, a 
volunteer worker at the Frank Callen 
Boys Club, a member of the West Broad 
Street Y.M.C.A., and a member of the 
Gaynistics Social Club. 

Currently, she is the faculty chairman 
of Anderson Street School, and is group 
leader of the second grade teachers for 
the city-wide, in-service. She is also a 
member of the Liaison committee. 

Mrs. Simmons has been employed by 
the board of education since 1951, and 
has served efficiently at Tompkins and 
Spencer Elementary Schools. In 1962, 
she came to Anderson School, with the 
well-earned reputation of being an out- 
standing and talented teacher. 

She is the wife of Walter B. Simmons, 
Sr., and the mother of two sons, Walter, 
Jr., and Ronald. 



He is presently a member of the 
Georgia Interscholastic Association, and 
Co-Chairman of the Region 
Counselor Group. 



Eight 



Mr. Harold B. Fields 

Tattnall County Industrial 

High School 

The principal and faculty of Tattnall 

County Industrial High School in Reids- 

ville, Georgia, has selected Mr. Harold 

B. Fields, Commercial Teacher and 

School Counselor as 

their "Teacher of 

the Year." 

Mr. Fields re- 
ceived the B.S. de- 
gree from Savan- 
nah State College. 

In an effort to 
display his athletic 
ability in high 
school, and college, 
he was an active 
participant in the 

following sports: Football, Basketball, 

and Track. 




Mr. Vernon L. Rhaney 
Alfred E. Beach High School 

Vernon L. Rhaney is a native Savan- 
nahian. His early education was received 
in the local public schools, and More- 
house College. He transferred to Savan- 
nah State College during his sophomore 
year, from which he received the B.A. 
degree. 

Mr. Rhaney taught mathematics and 
science for one year at Appling County 
Training School, Baxley, Georgia. The 
following year he began teaching mathe- 
matics at Tompkins Senior High School. 
In October of 1942, he entered the 
military service. 

Upon returning to civilian life in 
1945, Rhaney resumed his teaching 
duties at Tompkins Senior High School. 
In 1950, he was transferred to the new 
Alfred E. Beach Senior High School. In 
addition to his duties as a teacher of 
mathematics, he is prominently identi- 
fied with the school's guidance services 
program. Since 1950 he has served as 
advisor to the school safety patrol, and 
as a teacher of adult evening classes. 

He earned the M.A. degree from Co- 
lumbia University in 1951, and the Six- 
Year Certificate in Administration and 
Supervision in Secondary Education 
from New York University in 1955. 

In addition to being a member of 
St. Phillips A.M.E. Church, he is 
affiliated with the following: Phi Beta 
Sigma Fraternity; Phi Delta Kappa 
Educational Fraternity; Chatham 
County Teachers Association, the Geor- 
gia Teachers Educational Association, 
A.T.A.; and the National Education 
Association. 



Marie Gadsden, SS Alumna, 
Appointment With Peace Corps 

Marie Gadsden, a nationally known 
expert on teaching English as a foreign 
language, has been appointed a Train- 
ing Officer with the Peace Corps, ac- 
cording to an announcement by Peace 
Corps Director Sargent Shriver. 

Born in Douglas, Georgia, and raised 
in Savannah, Mrs. Gadsden is a gradu- 
ate of Georgia State, now Savannah 
State in Savannah. She received her 
M.A. in English from Atlanta Univer- 




Alfred E. Beach High School 
Teacher Receives Fellowship 

Verdelle Lambert, 1962 magna cum 
laude graduate of Savannah State Col- 
lege and presently employed as an Eng- 
lish teacher at Alfred E. Beach High 
School, becomes the first graduate of 
Savannah State College to receive a 
Wall Street Journal Fellowship in 
Journalism. She'll study this summer at 
Syracuse University. 

Miss Lambert was editor of the Sa- 
vannah State College prize winning 
Tiger's Roar during her senior year in 
college. She was recommended by the 
local high school officials and highly 
endorsed by Wilton C. Scott, Director 
of Public Relations at Savannah State 
College and Coordinator of student 
publications under whom she worked 
as a student. Scott was the recipient of 
a Wall Street honor. 1960 Journalism 
Fellowship at Columbia University, 1962 
— $500 cash Meritorious Service Award 
to Journalism and 1963 — Newspaper 
Grant to study journalism at Northern 
Illinois University. Scott serves as Chief 
Press Officer for State Teacher at Geor- 
gia and director of the Southern 
Regional School Press Institute, 
affiliated with Columbia University 
Scholastic Press Association. 



sity and her Ph.D., in English from the 
University of Wisconsin with a dis- 
sertation on "The Aesthetic of John 
Addington Symonds." 

Mrs. Gadsden has taught at all levels 
from elementary school to college. She 
has served on the faculties of Dillard 
University in New Orleans, Texas 
Southern in Houston and Howard Uni- 
versity in Washington, D. C, where her 
husband, Robert Washington Gadsden, 
Jr., works as an analyst for the Depart- 
ment of Defense. 




Members of the Bulloch County Chapter. Seated, left to right: Miss Johnnie 

Polk, Rufus R. Butler, Willie Jones, and Mrs. Ethylean Talbert. Standing, left 

to right: Crawford Tolbert, Tharon Stevens, Mrs. Florence Bates, Mrs. Eva 

Moore, John Lawton, and Groover Brown. 




MttHPt 






James Nevels (right) congratulates his brother, Father Harry Nevels, an Episco- 
pal priest of Albany, Georgia. Father Nevels spent his first two years of college 
at Savannah State before beginning his studies for the priesthood. Oree Rawls 

is in the center of the picture. 




Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Steele, Alumni 
of Savannah State, pose for the cam- 
era immediately after the program 
honoring Mrs. Sadie Steele. 




John Lawton, Principal of Julia P. 
Bryant Elementary School, Statesboro, 
Georgia, congratulates Willie C. Jones 
on his election to the presidency of 
the Bulloch County Chapter. 



Willie C. Jones, President of the Bul- 
loch County Chapter. 



Mrs. Ethylean Tolbert, outgoing Presi- 
dent of the Bulloch County Chapter. 



Support Your 

ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 



Walter Leonard, Former Savannah State 
College Editor, Makes National Spotlight 

Wife Works as Regional Secretary for Federal Government 

By Wilton C. Scott 

In speaking of outstanding graduates and former students, Savannah State 
College can point to Walter and Betty Singleton Leonard as ideal examples of what 
a State College education can do. Mr. Leonard is currently, licensed, doing business 
as the Leonard Land Company of Atlanta, Georgia, and is in good standing with 
the Georgia Real Estate Commission. He is a real estate broker. Mrs. Leonard is 
Secretary to the Deputy Regional Administrator for the Housing and Home Finance 
Agency, with headquarters in Atlanta, Ga. 

From 1946-50, Walter Leonard at- 



tended Savannah State College, where 
he participated in numerous school 
activities. He accompanied the Public 
Relations Director on several recruiting 
trips, and served as a member of the 
staff, and later Editor-in-Chief of "The 
Tiger's Roar." His wife, the former 
Betty Singleton, was a student aide for 
four years in the President's Office. 
She finished college, Cum Laude, with 
a major in business. 

Atlanta Mayor Salutes Leonard 

In a letter received by the Public 
Relations Office of Savannah State Col- 
lege, from the Honorable Ivan Allen, 
Jr., Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia, Leonard 
was praised for his service as campaign 
manager when the mayor was running 
for office. Mr. Allen said, "Walter 
served with me in my campaign for 
Mayor and was of great assistance. 

"I was particularly pleased with Mr. 
Leonard's fine organizational ability, 



his keen insight and his ability to 
execute an agreed upon plan. 

'T am delighted that you axe recog- 
nizing him on this occasion and wish 
to join with his host of friends in com- 
mendation of his many fine endeavors." 

Walter Makes Front Page of Wall 
Street Journal 

Because of his business ability, and 
civic activities, Walter Leonard was 
selected as an outstanding young busi- 
ness executive, and made the front page 
of The Wall Street Journal, Tuesday, 
March 18, 1964. He has only been in 
business fulltime, two years. In 1962, 
he sold $145,000 worth of real estate, 
and $200,000 in 1963. According to all 
indications it is probable that he will 
surpass this mark in 1964. This dis- 
tinguished couple are the proud parents 
of two children, Anthony Carlton, 11 
and Angela Michele, 9. Both attend St. 
Paul of the Cross School. In discussing 
how his wife received her Civil Service 




WALTER LEONARD 

appointment, Walter said, she made 97 
on the examination for Secretary- 
Stenographer position. 

Walter's Plea To American Youth 

In answering the question, how he 
would advise the American youth today, 
Mr. Leonard pointed out the famed 
words of Socrates "Know Thyself," 
Walter said that youth should work to- 
ward the discovery of his own ability 
and to develop that ability so that when 
the opportunity presents itself, he will 
be prepared. He stressed the value of 
being a responsible citizen, and partici- 
pating in the political life of the com- 
munity in which he lives. He empha- 
sized over and over again the value of 
being a registered voter who votes. 





The Leonards at home with children (left to right), An- 
thony Carlton, the wife, Betty, Walter, and Angela Michele. 



Walter Leonard, left of Mayor Allen, listens to one of the 
Mayor's famous fireside chats. On Mayor's right is L. D. 
Milton, President of Citizens Trust Company, a $12,000,000 
bank. To the left of Leonard, Mrs. Geneva Haugabrooks, 
a funeral directress in Atlanta, Georgia. 



Tiniotliy U. Ryals 
Banquet Speaker 

Timothy U. Ryals, "54," Chairman 
of the Business Department of Oconee 
High School, will deliver the Annual 
Alumni Address at the Alumni Banquet, 
May 30, 1964. Mr. Ryals is no stranger 
on the speaker's rostrum. He is one of 
the most widely sought young dynamic- 
speakers in the Southeast. 




His duties at Oconee High are only a 
small measure of his great and varied 
talents. He serves as Director of the 
Choral Society of the school. His choral 
group has won wide acclaim through- 
out the State. Century Record Company 
of California has recorded "Songs of 
the Negro," sung by his group. They 
have won first place in the G.I. A. Dis- 
trict IX for the last four years. They 
represented the State of Georgia in the 
Tri-State Music Festival at Winston 
State College, this spring. They have 
made several television appearances in 
Savannah and have performed for the 
G. T. & E. A. Annual Meeting in Sa- 
vannah and Atlanta. 

He is now serving as Advisor to the 
Junior Class. He has served as Advisor 
to the Hi-Y, the student newspaper and 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Student 
Activity Fund. He has also served as 
Chairman of the Commencement Com- 
mittee and Chairman of the Steering 
Committee for Evaluation of Oconee 
High School. He has served on the 
Curriculum Committee. 

His outstanding work at Oconee was 
a key consideration in his election to 
the presidency of the Dublin Unit of 



the G. T. & E. A. as well as other im- 
portant posts. Among these are: 
"Teacher of the Year" for the City 
System of Dublin in 1961, a member 
of the Evaluation Committee of Central 
High School in Sylvania, Georgia; and 
President of District IX of the G.I.A., 
an organization consisting of 21 schools. 
This summer, he will serve as a mem- 
ber of the Oconee High Summer School 
Faculty. He is presently Publicity 
Chairman for Oconee High. 

His activities in the Dublin com- 
munity are many. He is Music Director 
for the City-Wide Youth Fellowship of 
Dublin, Musical Director for Zion 
Baptist Sunday School and Baptist 
Training Conventions which consist of 
approximately thirty churches. He has 
served as chairman of the Red Cross 
Fund Drive. He is Organist of the First 
Baptist Church and Secretary of the 
Men's Fellowship Club. 

He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha 
Fraternity, Inc., the Free Accepted 
Masons, and Delta Pi Epsilon, the 
Honorary Business Fraternity. 

He has toured Europe extensively, 
having been to London, Paris and other 
cities of France; Rome, Florence, 
Switzerland, Amsterdam, and other 
cities of Holland; West Germany, and 
Austria. While in Austria, he attended 
the Passion Play. 

As an undergraduate at Savannah 
State, he served as President of the 
Student Council, President of the Busi- 
ness Club, member of the Choral 
Society, member of the Collegiate 
Council, Treasurer of Delta Eta Chapter 
of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., 
Organist for the College Assembly, a 
tutor of Alpha Kappa Mu, pianist of 
the Sunday School, secretary of the 
Y.M.C.A., Vice President of the Junior 
Class, and Drum Major of the March- 
ing Band. In 1954, he was named "Man 
of the Year." 

In addition to his B.S. degree from 
Savannah State, he holds the M.S. de- 
gree in business from New York Uni- 
versity and has worked toward the doc- 
torate degree. Although he has received 
several offers to move up to the college 
level, he has remained in secondary 
work, because he feels that he can make 
his greatest impact there. 

H. H. Dudley, well known Dublin 
businessman and Negro leader sums up 
Mr. Ryals' success in this way: "He 
knows how to disseminate his knowledge 
to others." 



Alumnus Receives Grant From 
National Science Foundation 

James M. English, an instructor at 

A. E. Beach Junior High School, has 

received a grant from the National 

Science Foundation. Under this grant — 

his second — he will 

study toward the 

master's degree at 

Miami University, 

Oxford. Ohio. 

In 1962, English 
received h i s first 
grant from the Na- 
tional Science 
Foundation, a n d 
studied during the 
summer, at Penn- 
sylvania State Uni- 
versity. 

English was born in Savannah, Geor- 
gia, and attended Paulsen Elementary 
School. He graduated from Alfred E. 
Beach High School in 1951. In 1956, 
he received the B.S. degree from Sa- 
vannah State College, with a major in 
general science and minor in mathe- 
matics. 

He is married to the former Miss 
Albertha Sheppard of this city, and the 
father of two small daughters, Kimberly 
and Michelle. 




Mrs. Sessoms President-elect of 
National Alumni Association 

Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms is president- 
elect of the National Alumni Associa- 
tion. She was born and received her 
early education in Allendale County, 
South Carolina. 

Mrs. Sessoms received the B.S. de- 
gree from Savannah State College, and 
the M.Ed, degree from Atlanta Univer- 
sity, and has done advance work at 
New York, and Atlanta Universities. 

Some of her work experiences in- 
clude: Teacher of Home Economics at 
Mayo High School, Darlington, S. C, 
and Savannah State College. Principal 
of Junior High School, Thomas County, 
Georgia; Critic Teacher & Workshop 
Consultant, Savannah State College; 
Curriculum Director & Supervisor, 
Tattnall and Evans counties. She is 
presently Curriculum Director & Super- 
visor at Evans County. 

Mrs. Sessoms is affiliated with: Nu 
Chapter, Iota Phi Lambda Sorority; 
Savannah State College Alumni Associa- 
tion, Tattnall County Chapter; National 
Association of Supervisors and Con- 
sultants; Georgia Jeanes Curriculum Di- 
rectors Association; Association for 
Supervision & Curriculum Development; 
G.T.E.A.; Elite Temple No. 71, 
I.B.P.O.E. of W. — Savannah, Georgia; 
Woman's Auxiliary to South Atlanta 
Medical Society. 



Rapid Progress of Expansion Being 
Made at Savannah State College 



Rapid progress is being made at the 
which will provide additional modern fac 
well-rounded, educational program for all 
the University System has authorized the 
at the College: 

1. A dormitory, presently under con- 
struction, to house 100 women students 
will be ready for occupancy in Septem- 
ber, 1964. This two-story brick build- 
ing will be constructed at a cost of ap- 
proximately $280,000. It will include 
grooming rooms for beauty culture, a 
snack kitchen, a laundrette, and a com- 
bination room for lounging, reception 
and recreation. Two young ladies will 
be housed to a room. 

2. Another dormitory for 180 young 
women at a cost of approximately 
$520,000 will be constructed on Taylor 
Road, south of Powell Hall and west 
of the new dormitory for women now 
being built; it is planned for occupancy 
in September, 1965. 

3. A two-story, air-conditioned class- 
room building at a cost of approxi- 
mately $425,000 is in the final stages 
of planning, and will be built on Taylor 
Road, south of the Technical Science 
Building across the street from Powell 
Hall. This plant will consist of 15 class- 
rooms, data processing facilities, a 
language laboratory, a reading clinic, 
and an administration area with office 
space for 33 instructors. 

4. A four-unit, all weather, lighted 
tennis court is being erected adjacent 
to the athletic field. 

5. A $400,000 annex to Wiley Gym- 
nasium. This new physical education 
facility will consist of a swimming pool, 
classrooms, and additional spectator 
seating for indoor sports. 

The above listed facilities along with 
already available at Sa- 
College will provide the 
faculty with a desirable 



the facilities 
vannah State 
students and 



environment for greater learning activi- 
ties. 

Savannah State College is dedicated 
to the development of thorough and 
sound programs which will prepare its 
graduates to meet the needs of the 
competitive age in which we live, and 
which we face in the future. 

The College now includes six divisions 
and 14 departments which gives stu- 
dents a wide variety of courses from 
which to select. The major divisions are 
Business Administration, Education, 
Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social 
Sciences, and Technical Sciences. 
Through the offerings of these divisions, 
students may prepare for varied careers 
in the areas of art, modern foreign 
languages, English and literature, 



College in developing a building program 

ilities for the prosecution of a sound and 

of our students. The Board of Regents of 

following additions to the physical plant 



biology, chemistry, mathematics and 
physics, physical education, home eco- 
nomics, music, history, economics, 
sociology, poltical science, engineering 
technology, and industrial education. 

Authorization has been received for 
a Music and Fine Arts Building, at an 
approximate cost of $1,130,000, and a 
new dormitory for men, which will 
house 180 men. 



Southern Education 
Foundation Workshop 
June 29 - July 17, 1964 

Fifteen in-service home economists 
have been awarded Southern Education 
Foundation Scholarships to attend a 
workshop in New Foods and New Meth- 
ods of Cookery, June 29 through July 
17. The criteria upon which the par- 
ticipants were selected included related 
science background, interest in promot- 
ing newer vocational careers for prom- 
ising students, and contributions to the 
field of home economics. Workshop ex- 
periences will include lectures, discus- 
sions, laboratory preparation experi- 
ences with new foods, consumer evalua- 
tion techniques and field trips. The type 
of foods to be used in the workshop are 
freeze-dried. dehydrated, frozen, irradi- 
ated, and Proten meats. 

Outstanding Consultants have been 
secured from federal, state, and private 
agencies, to point up the importance of 
new foods in terms of world food sup- 
ply, and consumption. Those persons 
scheduled to participate as consultants, 
leaders, and speakers are: 

Dr. John Powers, Head, Dept. of 
Food Technology, University of Geor- 
gia. 

Dr. Kermit Bird, Agricultural Econo- 
mist, Marketing Economics Division, 
United States Department of Agricul- 
ture. 

Dr. Mary Hill, Nutritionist, Agricul- 
tural Research Service, United States 
Department of Agriculture. 

Miss Lorraine Berger, Home Econo- 
mist, Swift & Company, Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 

Dr. Carrie Mae Marquess, Florida A. 
& M. University. 

Dr. Charles Pratt, Savannah State 
College. 

Mr. Everett Ellis, Savannah Sugar 
Refinery. 



Special 

A nnouncement 

SUBJECT : Journalism Grants 
Awarded by Savannah Stale Col- 
lege, Sponsored by the Newspaper 
Fund, Inc., which is financed by 
Wall Street Journal. 

Below is a list of all of the recipients 
of scholarship grants awarded by Sa- 
vannah State College for the Journalism 
Workshop to be held July 20-31. 1964. 
Eighteen full scholarships have been 
awarded which include: Matriculation 
fee, health fee. student activity fee, and 
room and board, while seven partial 
scholarships include: matriculation fee, 
health fee, and student activity fee. 

The recipients of the full scholarships 
are: Mrs. Richie T. Adams, Quitman. 
Georgia; Miss Eula Mae Battle, Colum- 
bus, Georgia; Mrs. Lula B. Bass, Co- 
lumbus, Georgia; Mrs. Gwendolyn T. 
Conyers, Bainbridge, Georgia; Mrs. El- 
nora W. Edmondson, Jesup. Georgia ; 
Robert James, Jr., Russellville, Ala- 
bama; Mrs. Mary F. Jenkins, Albany, 
Georgia; Mrs. Flossie Mae Johnson, 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

Mrs. Starr Jordan Kay, Athens, Geor- 
gia; Mrs. Beatrice H. McClammy, 
Greensboro, North Carolina; James J. 
Mitchell, Tallahassee, Florida; Paul 
Burgette Mohr, St. Petersburg, Florida ; 
Mrs. Gussie Davidson Moore, Atlanta. 
Georgia ; Mrs. Laura B. Odol. Black- 
shear, Georgia; Mrs. Addie C. Sloan. 
Atlanta, Georgia; Mrs. Frances G. Wad- 
dell, Savannah, Georgia; Mrs. Nettie 
Marshall Webb, Atlanta, Georgia; Mrs. 
Evelyn M. Wright, Athens, Georgia. 

The recipients of partial scholarships 
are: Boast Cephas Carswell, Jr., Colum- 
bus, Georgia; Mrs. Katie B. Glenn, 
Dublin, Georgia; Miss Mamie E. 
Greene, Newnan, Georgia; Theodore W. 
Green, Soperton, Georgia; Mrs. Carolyn 
R. Screen, Savannah, Georgia; Mrs. 
Hazel D. Van Buren, Statesboro, Geor- 
gia; Mrs. Margaret P. White, Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

Alternates for full and partial schol- 
arships are: Mrs. Alta E. Vaughn, Knox- 
ville, Tennessee; Mrs. Addie S. More- 
land, Pelham, Georgia; Miss Julia E. 
Cheeley, Crawfordville, Georgia; and 
Mrs. Georgia Y. Gordon, Savannah, 
Georgia. 



Alumna Works in Office 
Of Public Relations 

Mrs. Carolyn Robinson Screen is 
Secretary to the Director of Public Re- 
lations at Savannah State College. She 
has served in this capacity for four 
months. 

She received the B.S. degree with a 
major in secretarial science, and minor 
in English from Savannah State College 
in August of 1963. 

Mrs. Screen is married to Porter 
Screen, a Firefighter with the City of 
Savannah, and the mother of four chil- 
dren. 




Mrs. Robinson Instructor 
In Biology Department 

Mrs. Margaret Chisholm Robinson is 
an instructor of biology at Savannah 
State College. She is a native of Savan- 
nah, and the daughter of Mr. Ralph 
Chisholm, Sr., of 
this city. 

Mrs. Robinson's 
early education was 
received in the pub- 
lic schools of this 
city. She received 
the B.S. degree, 
Magna Cum Laude, 
from Savannah 
State College in 
1952, and the M.S. 
degree in biology 
from the University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor, Michigan, in 1955. 

In 1961, she was the recipient of a 
National Science Foundation Summer 
Institute Grant to study at Washington 
State University, Pullman, Washington, 
under the auspices of the Botanical So- 
ciety of America. 

Currently, she is the recipient of a 
National Science Foundation Academic 
Year Institute Grant to study toward the 
Ph.D. degree at Washington University, 
St. Louis, Missouri, academic year 
1964-65. 

Her special areas of interest are Plant 
Physiology and Molecular Biology. 

Prior to returning to Savannah State 
College, she taught at Jefferson County 
Training School and at Fort Valley 
State College. 

Mrs. Robinson is the wife of Mr. 
Moses Robinson, and the mother of two 
children; she is presently serving as 
undergraduate advisor of Gamma Upsi- 
lon Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha 
Sorority. 

She is a member of Alpha Nu Chap- 
ter of Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society 
and several Botanical, Biological, and 
Professional Societies. 



Alumna Is Switchboard 
Operator at SSC 

Mrs. Alice B. Williams works as 
switchboard operator at Savannah State 
College. She is a native of Nashville, 
Tennessee. 

Her elementary and high school edu- 
cation was received 
at Haven Home and 

a Alfred E. Beach 

High Schools, re- 
spectively. In June 
of 1954, she gradu- 
ated as valedictorian 
from Alfred E. 
Beach High School. 
In June of 1958, 
she received the B.S. 
degree from Savan- 
nah State College, 
with a major in English and a minor 
in social science. 

Mrs. Williams has taught in the public 
school systems of Chatham and Green- 
wood Counties. 





Mrs. Milton Secretary 
In Personnel Services 

Mrs. Lois H. Milton has been asso- 
ciated with the college since 1961, and 
is presently employed in the Office of 
Student Personnel Services as Secretary 
of Testing and Guid- 
ance. 

Mrs. Milton is the 
daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert F. 
Hughes, and re- 
ceived her early 
education in the 
public schools of 
Dublin, Georgia. 
She is a graduate of 
Oconee High 
School. In 1956, 
she entered Savannah State College, ma- 
joring in business education and minor- 
ing in English. Se received the B.S. de- 
gree in 1961. 

She is married to William J. Milton 
of Savannah, and the mother of a small 
daughter, Melissa. 




Miss Dixon Secretary 

In Chemistry Department 

Darnell Myrtice Dixon is presently 
employed as Secretary in the Chemistry 
Department of Savannah State College. 

She is a native of Rhine, Georgia, 
where she attended the public schools. 

Miss Dixon received the bachelor of 
science degree from Savannah State 
College in 1963, with a major in Busi- 
ness Education. She is a member of 
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority. 




Alumnus Heads Division 
Of Business Administration 

Dr. Hayward S. Anderson, a native 
Georgian, and graduate of Savannah 
State College (then Georgia State Col- 
lege), is Chairman 
of the Division of 
Business Adminis- 
tration at Savannah 
State College. 

Before coming to 
Savannah State Col- 
lege, Dr. Anderson 
taught in New York 
City, and at West 
Virginia State Col- 
lege. He has also 
worked in private 
industry, for himself, and for the gov- 
ernment. 

Dr. Anderson received the B.S. degree 
from Savannah State College, with a 
major in Business Administration, and 
a minor in Natural Science. He has 
also received the B.S. degree from 
Northwestern University, with a major 
in Accounting, and a minor in Finance, 
Marketing, and Management. M.B.A. 
degree from New York University, 
major Advertising, and minor Real 
Estate ,and Personnel Management. 
D.B.A. from Harvard Business School, 
with a major in Business Administra- 
tion. 

During his senior year at Savannah 
State College, he entered the Army, and 
served in several capacities, both as an 
enlisted man and as an officer. He was 
honorably discharged a 1st Lieutenant. 



Alumnus Is Band Director 
At Savannah State College 

Samuel Arthur Gill, a graduate of 
Savannah State College, is presently an 
instructor of music and band director 
at Savannah State College. 

Mr. Gill was born and reared in Sa- 
vannah, Georgia. He 
attended Woodville 
Elementary School, 
now known as 
Tompkins Elemen- 
tary, and completed 
his high school 
training at Beach- 
Cuyler High School 
of this city. 

After finishing 
high school, he 
traveled over the 
country performing with various jazz 
groups. In 1943, he entered the Armed 
Forces, serving in the capacity of solo 
trumpeter with the 159th U. S. Ground 
Force Band. 




■ 



10 



Summer Science Training 
Program Announced 

Dr. Charles Pratt, Head, Department 
of Chemistry, announces the opening 
of the Summer Science Training Pro- 
gram. This program will endeavor to 
provide opportunities for thirty high 
school students of outstanding ability in 
chemistry to spend eight weeks on the 
campus for advanced study in a college 
environment. 

The students will be able to study 
subject matter in modern chemistry 
which is not generally included in high 
school curricula. The students will fol- 
low a course that will include individual 
projects, and experiments emphasizing 
quantitative measurements. It is antici- 
pated that with the utilization of mod- 
ern instruments the experiments will be 
more intriguing. Standardized tests in 
chemistry, science and mathematics will 
be administered at the beginning and 
at the termination of the program. The 
purpose of the tests will be two-fold: 
(1) to determine in what areas the stu- 
dents are weak, and (2) to measure 
their progress in the course. 



The school day will be from 8:30 
a.m. - 12:00 noon, and from 2:00 p.m. - 
4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 
The morning sessions will be devoted 
to formal lectures, problem sessions, 
film presentations, and lectures by guest 
speakers. The afternoon sessions will 
be devoted to chemistry projects, labora- 
tory and local field trips. The program's 
general objective will be an effort to 
enrich the student's knowledge of chem- 
istry and science in general. 

The high school students who have 
been accepted are: Glorious J. M. 
Leatherwood, Route 1, Taylors, South 
Carolina; Willie Frank Gerald, 1904-B 
Brown Street, Conway, South Carolina; 
Sherrie Ruth Griffin, 2101 1 /2 Ogeechee 
Road, Savannah, Georgia; Wallace Lee 
Hall, Route 2, Box 2, Collins, Georgia; 
Leroy Wright, Jr., 5 Fluke Avenue, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia; Nedra Millicent Hug- 
gins, 1526 Audubon Drive, Savannah, 
Georgia; Stanley John McClinton, 2 
Staley Avenue, Savannah, Georgia; 
Jenefer Clark, Claxton, Georgia; Judith 
Jordan, Savannah State College, Savan- 
nah, Georgia; David Hicks, Route 3, 
Box E, Vidalia, Georgia; Henry Lee 
Strong, General Delivery, Winterville, 



Georgia; George Frank Wyncott, 1107 
West Main, North Manchester, Indiana; 
Barbara Jean Bryant, 1913 West 59th 
Street, Savannah, Georgia; Ronald May- 
nard Rivers, 502 W. Victory Drive, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia; Martha Lee Bryant, 
3110 Arlington, Bessemer, Alabama; 
John Earl Lang, 308 West 42nd Street, 
Savannah, Georgia; Gerald Boyd Math- 
ews, 1511 Mike, Tallahassee, Florida; 
Sheila Mozelle Clemmons, 2201 West 
Victory Drive, Savannah, Georgia; Bar- 
bara Wynn, 5123 Ranstead Street, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Milenda 
Cooper, Route 2, Box 101, Watkinsville, 
Georgia; Sheila Ann Mobley, 1011 46th 
Street, Savannah, Georgia; Alma Jacqu- 
line Porter, 908 East 37th Street, Savan- 
nah, Georgia; Dennis Orson Brown, 
255A Fox Court, Savannah, Georgia; 

Michael Charles Pratt, 7226 Skid- 
away Road, Savannah, Georgia; Ora 
Lee Clemmons, P. 0. Box 101, South- 
port, North Carolina; Constance Y. 
Lester, Rte. 1, Box 234, Portal, Geor- 
gia; Helen N. Cromer, P .0. Box 385, 
Whitmire, South Carolina; Jeanette 
Campbell, 509 Shelter Avenue, Jackson- 
ville, Florida; Marva Taylor, 2235 
Brido Road, Jacksonville, Florida. 



New Women's Dormitory 




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Miss Savannah State College — Irene Elmore, a senior from Savannah, 
Georgia, majoring in Business Administration. 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 

HOMECOMING EDITION 1964 



?e 



That was the Year that was 



And ye, who have met with adversity's blast, 
And been bow'd to the earth with its fury; 

To whom the twelve months that have recently 

I pass' d 

Were as harsh as a prejudiced jury — 

Still, fill to the Future! and join in our chime, 
The regrets of remembrance to cozen, 

And having obtained a New Trial of Time, 
Should in hopes of a kindlier dozen. 

Hood 

THE YEAR THATS AWA' 

Here's to the year that's awa'! 

We will (greet) it in strong and in swa'; 

And here's to ilk bonnie young lassie we lo'ed, 
While swift flew the year that's awa'. 

Here's to the sodger who bled, 

And the sailor who bravely did fa'; 

Their fame is alive though their spirits are fled 
On the wings of the year that's awa'. 

Here's to the friends we can trust 
When storms of adversity blow; 

May they live in our songs and be nearest our hearts, 
Nor depart like the year that's awa'. 

hjohn Dunlop 
_„._ 

President Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations and Editor-in-Chief .. Wilton C. Scott 

Issue Editor Carolyn. R. Screen^ 

Feature Editor J. Randolph Fisher 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Volume XVIII October, 1964 Number 1 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly in October, December, 
February, March, April, and May by Savannah State College. Second Class mail 
privileges authorized at Savannah, Georgia. 






PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 




Greetings to Alumni and Friends 
On Homecoming Day 

The Savannah State College family joins me in 
extending a sincere and hearty welcome to you, the 
alumni and friends, who have come to observe the 
1964 Homecoming activities with us. We greet you 
with the wish that this day will be one long remem- 
bered in the years to come as you renew old acquain- 
tances, meet new friends, and reawaken some of the 
pleasant memories of your days at SSC. We look 
forward each year with pleasant expectancy to this 
day on which we, too, greet old friends and make 
new ones. 

In your homecoming, we hope you see the prog- 
ress the College is making toward providing a better 
educational program for the young people of today 
and the world leaders of tomorrow. We are in the 
midst of a building program which will, not only 
enhance the beauty of the campus, but insure the 
continued development of the institution toward its 
highest potential. 

We are happy to welcome our friends and visitors 
from Morris College; and as the two teams compete 
on the gridiron in friendly athletic rivalry, we know 
we shall see a display of the finest quality of colle- 
giate sportsmanship. 

Again, we extend to you every good wish for an 
enjoyable celebration on this occasion of Home- 
coming. 

HOWARD JORDAN, JR. 
President 





GREETINGS FROM MORRIS COLLEGE 



Morris College joins me in extending our greetings to you on the happy 
occasion of your Annual Homecoming. 

Our presence here today affords a personal opportunity to commend 
you for the challenges which you have met and conquered in expanding 
your educational efforts. 

It is our hope that this spirited and challenging experience on the 
gridiron will prove not merely rewarding in the sense of athletic skill and 
power, but that it will strengthen the ties that bind our two growing institu- 
tions of higher learning in a common cause — a devotion to and dedication 
in intellectual adventure. 

0. R. REUBEN, President 




QUEEN 



Years know more than books. \ 



George Herbert 




Miss SSC and Attendants — Left to right: Freda 
Hunter, a Senior from Fitzgerald, Georgia, majoring 
in Elementary Education; Irene Elmore, Miss SSC, a 
Senior from Savannah, Georgia, majoring in Business 
Administration; Mary E. Smith, a Senior from Car- 
tersville, Georgia, majoring in Biology. 



We spend our years as a tale that is told. 



QUEEN 



Old Testament 





Miss Morris College — Miss Albertha Graham, a 

Senior from Georgetown, South Carolina, majoring 

in Biology. 



CAMPUS QUEENS 




H 



A thousand years in thy sight are but as 


yesterday when it is past, and as a watch 


in the night. 

Old Testament 




Miss Senior — Sherbie Best, a graduate of William 

James High School, Statesboro, Georgia, is majoring 

in Social Science. 



Miss Sophomore — Jacqueline Mack is a Sophomore, 

majoring in Business Education, and a graduate of 

Sol C. Johnson High School of Savannah, Ga. 





Miss Junior and Attendants — Left to right: Lillie 
Kyles is a graduate of Sol C. Johnson High School, 
Savannah, Georgia; Brenda Jordan, Miss Junior, is a 
graduate of Boddie High School, Milledgeville, Ga.; 
Patricia Ryan is a graduate of Monitor High School, 
Fitzgerald, Georgia. 



Miss Freshman — Patricia Belcher, a graduate of Car- 
ver High School of Columbus, Georgia, is majoring 
in Sociology. 



4 







Miss Camilla Hubert Hall- 
Elizabeth Simpkins. 




SJSlJwS>_ 




Miss Wright Hall — Catherine 
Shavers. 




CAMPUS QUEENS 

In marks outrageous and 

austere 
The years go by in single 

file; 
But none has merited my 

fear, 

And none has quite es- 
caped my smile. 

Elinor Wylie 




■ 




Miss Scroller — Jacqueline 
Ryles. 



Miss New Girls' Dormitory- 
Murnace Coleman. 



Miss Social Science — Frances 
Smith. 




Miss Technical Science and 
Attendant — Left to right: 
Marie Butler; Gwendolyn Mil- 
ler, Miss Technical Science. 



Miss Lampoda — Iris Wright. 



CAMPUS QUEENS 

The years teach much 
Which the days never 

know. 
All sorts of things and 

weather 
Must be taken together, 
To make up a year. 




Miss Kappa Alpha Psi and At- 
tendant — Left to right: Eloise 
Glover; Vivian McMillan, 
Miss Kappa. 




Miss Delta Sigma Theta and 
Attendants — Left to right: 
Florence Rhaney; Miss Delta, 
Minnie Thompson; and Har- 
versteen Harris. 



Miss Zeta Phi Beta — Ruth 
Ziegler. 




Miss Sigma Gamma Rho — 
Eleanor Allen. 




Miss Alpha Phi Alpha — Pa- 
tricia Ann Gardner is a Sopho- 
more from Magnolia, Missis- 
sippi, majoring in Elementary 
Education. 




Miss Omega Psi Phi and At 
tendants — Left to right: Paul 
ette Johnson; Miss Omega, 
Betty Gordon; and Frances 
Souther land. 



Hss Phi Beta Sigma — Left to 
right: Ira Troup; Blondell Og- 
den, Miss Phi Beta Sigma; 
Theresa Tillman. 



Miss Alpha Kappa Alpha and 
Attendants — Left to right: 
Donnie Pickett; Shirley 
Bunche, Miss AKA; Margie 
Simmons. 




FACTS ABOUT SSC 




Savannah State College is located off Taylor 
Road and Falligant Avenue, in the historic city of 
Savannah, Georgia, which is the oldest city and chief 
seaport of the state, as well as the first capital. 

The campus, comprising one hundred and thirty- 
six acres, presents a setting of matchless natural 
beauty. Among the more outstanding buildings are: 
Camilla Hubert Hall, Adams Hall, and Meldrim 
Hall, consisting of administrative offices, the audi- 
torium, and classrooms. 

There are several new buildings on the campus 
which include: a million dollar technical science 
building; a half-million dollar library; Wiley Gym- 
nasium, which is annexed to Willcox Gymnasium; 
Richard R. Wright Hall; a sewage disposal system, 
and a heating plant. 

A dormitory to house 100 women students was 
opened at the beginning of the Fall Quarter, 1964. 
This two-story brick structure was constructed at a 
cost of approximately $280,000. It includes groom- 
ing rooms for beauty culture, a snack kitchen, a 
laundrette, and a combination room for lounging, 
reception and recreation. Two young ladies are 
housed in a room. 

The science building has been remodeled, and 
the College has a language laboratory equipped with 
various types of machines, and a reading clinic with 
modern facilities. Hill Hall has been remodeled and 
now houses a beautiful center, post office, snack bar, 
bookstore, the offices of Student Personnel Services, 
and Testing and Guidance. Morgan Hall has been 
remodeled and houses the business department. The 
College Infirmary, a modern eighteen-bed structure, 
provides for students who require treatment or con- 
finement for minor illness, has also been remodeled. 

The College now includes six divisions and 14 
departments which give students a wide variety of 
courses from which to select. The major divisions 
are Business Administration, Education, Humani- 
ties, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, and Techni- 
cal Sciences. Through the offerings of these divi- 
sions, students may prepare for varied careers in 
the areas of art, modern foreign languages, English 
and literature, biology, chemistry, mathematics and 
physics, physical education, home economics, music, 
history, economics, sociology, political science, engi- 
neering technology, and industrial education. 

Rapid progress is being made at the College in 
developing a building program which will provide 
additional modern facilities for the prosecution of 






a sound and well-rounded, educational program for 
all of our students. The Board of Regents of the 
University System has authorized the following ad- 
ditions to the physical plant at the College: 

1. Another dormitory for 180 women at a cost 
of approximately $520,000 will be constructed on 
Taylor Road, south of Powell Hall and west of the 
new dormitory for women completed this quarter. 
It is planned for occupancy in September, 1965. 

2. A two-story air-conditioned classroom build- 
ing at a cost of approximately $500,000 is in the 
final stages of planning, and will be built on Taylor 
Road, south of the Technical Science Building across 
the street from Powell Hall. This plant will consist 
of 15 classrooms, data processing facilities, a lan- 
guage laboratory, a reading clinic, and an adminis- 
tration area with office space for 33 instructors. 

3. A four-unit, all weather, lighted tennis court 
has been erected adjacent to the athletic field, and 
now is in use. 

4. A $400,000 annex to Wiley Gymnasium. 
This new physical education facility will consist of 
a swimming pool, classrooms, and additional spec- 
tator seating for indoor sports. 

5. Plans and specifications for a dormitory to 
accommodate 180 men are in the final stages. This 
dormitory will be built at the entrance of the cam- 
pus, on the corner of Falligant Avenue and Taylor 
Road. It will be a modern three-story facility, and 
will consist of nine bedrooms of the studio type. 
The building will include a lobby, recreational areas, 
and apartment for the house director, barber shop, 
room for TV viewing and laundromat. This new 
facility will be completely air-conditioned and con- 
structed at an approximate cost of $600,000. It is 
estimated that this dormitory will be ready for oc- 
cupancy in September, 1966. 

6. Authorization has been received for a Music 
and Fine Arts Building at an approximate cost of 
$500,000, which will include a Little Theatre for 
dramatics. 

The above listed facilities along with the facili- 
ties already available at Savannah State College will 
provide the students and faculty with a desirable 
environment for greater learning activities. 

Savannah State College is dedicated to the de- 
velopment of thorough and sound programs which 
will prepare its graduates to meet the needs of the 
competitive age in which we live, and which we all 
face in the future. 



FOOTBALL 





SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE TIGERS 

vs. 

MORRIS COLLEGE 

Sumter, S. C. 
Saturday, October 17, 1964 

2 P. M. — SSC Athletic Field 




Albert E. Frazier, Athletic Director at SSC. 




SSCs Coaching Staff — Left to right: Richard K. Washington, Defensive Coach; Leo Richardson, Head 
Coach; Frank Simmons, Line Coach; and John Mason, Offensive Coach. 



FOOTBALL 








1964 SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE TIGERS AND COACHING STAFF 



Blue White 



Age 



Name 
ENDS 

82 82 Ford, Herbert 21. 

83 83 Rawls, Oree 22. 

84 80 Mitchell, John 18. 

88 81 Singleton, Harold 19 

87 87 Nance, Terry 17. 

TACKLES 

76 76 Lewis, Bernard 23. 

71 71 Carter, Bobby 20. 

72 72 Jones, Winston 18. 

74 74 Singley, Allen 17 

75... ...75 Handy, William 18. 

70 73 Rutland, Charles 18. 

GUARDS 

61 61 Williams, Charles 18. 

69 69 Dorsey, Freddie 18 

63 63 Sears, Al 17.. 

66 66 Sears, Johnny 20. 

69 60 Kelly, Steven 18. 

65 65 Adams, Reginald 18. 

62 62 Johnson, George 21. 

64 64 Bell, Robert 21. 

CENTERS 
51 51 Stokes, Joseph 22. 



53 
52. 
50. 

14. 
34 
35 
31 
33. 



54 German, William 22. 

.55 Bush, Johnnie 19. 

50 Simmons, Willie 19. 

HALFBACKS 

.14 Hardy, William 19. 

.18 Woods, James 18. 

.17 Davis, Kenneth 19. 

30 Davis, Dennis 17. 

.15 Westmore, Carl 18. 

. — Marshall, Samuel 18 



Height Weight 



6'1". 
6'1". 
6'0" 
6'2" 
6'2". 



5'9". 

6'3" 

6'2". 

.511" 

6'2". 



5'8". . 
5'9". . 
6'3"... 
5'10". 
6'0".. 
.6'2%" 
5'11". 
5'7"... 



6'1"... 
5'9"... 
5'11". 

5'9%' 

5'8"... 
6'0".. 
5'9". 
5'10". 
5'11" 
5'10". 



School 



170 Johnson 

.190 Center 

150 Johnson 

160 Tompkins 

181 West Side Anderson 



Hometown 

Savannah 

Waycross 

Savannah 

Savannah 



6'1" 228 Steubenville Steubenville 



210 Johnson Savannah 

200 Richardson Lake City 

200 Johnson Savannah 

206 Johnson Savannah 

229 Drew Winter Garden 



170 Howard 

176 Central 

193 Johnson 

173 Johnson 

190 Northwestern 

202 Jones 

224 Jones 

165 Dickerson 



Georgetown 

Palatka 

... Savannah 
... Savannah 

Miami 

Orlando 

Orlando 

Vidalia 



185 Johnson Savannah 

175 Johnson Savannah 

172 Johnson Savannah 

178 St. Helena Frogmore 



160 Central 

160 Johnson 

170 Trenton 

168 Carver .. 

175 Tinoli .... 

165 



... Palatka 
Savannah 
... Trenton 

Miami 

DeFuniak 
Parker Birmingham 



Ferguson, Charles 19 5'10" 175 Central Newark 

Cunningham, Paul 20 5'9" 195 Steubenville Steubenville 



— — Hickson, William 23. 



6'1". 



180 Laney 



32 



Augusta 

Witherspoon, Lewis 17 5'11" 170 Brown Charleston 

FULLBACKS 

5'10" 

5'7" 

5'ii" 



12 

11. 

10 
13 



32 Blakeney, Joseph 22 

. — Gaulden, William 18 

. — Spencer, Robert 18 

QUARTERBACKS 

.12 Ellis, Frank 20 

.11 Burke, Jimmy 19 

10 Ford, Vaughn 17 

13 Fulton, Walter 17 



195 Simon Gratz Waynesboro 

.175 Monitor Fitzgerald 

185 Richardson Lake City 



5'10". 
6'2".. 
5'9"... 
6'4"... 



165 Johnson . 

170 Johnson . 

.165 Gilbert ... 

.170 Anderson 



... Savannah 
... Savannah 
Jacksonville 
Jacksonville 



We 7/ Go, Go, Go, in 64 * 




William German, Center 



Johnny Sears, Guard 

1 



Bernard Lewis, Tackle 



Joseph Blakeney, Fullback 




Paul Cunningham, Halfback 



King Simmons, Center 



Robert Bell, Guard 



Frank Ellis, Quarterback 



\> 






'**( ' * 





Dennis Davis, Halfback 



-■ 
Al Sears, Guard 




Kenneth Davis, Halfback 



Carl Westmore, Halfback 




' 



Herbert Ford, End 



WsWSmmm M. 

William Hardy, Halfback 



William Hickson, Halfback Samuel Marshall, Halfback 



10 



MORRIS COLLEGE'S FOOTBALL TEAM 



FOOTBALL 





sr 



u3& $]£&£&< 







Morris College's Coaching Staff 



A Group of Morris College Football Players 






11 



THE BAND 




The swift years slip and slide down the 

steep ; 
The slow years pass; neither will come 

again. 

William Sharp 




SSC's Marching Band 



Samuel Gill, Director of the 
Marching Tigers. 







Irum Majors — Left to right: Marvin 
Urkland, Savannah, Georgia; and Ar- 
thur Edmondson, Savannah, Georgia. 




Majorettes — Left to right: Paulette Si- 
bert, Savannah, Georgia; Franky Lam- 
bert, Savannah, Georgia; Norma Ben- 
nett, Jacksonville, Florida; and Patricia 
Sibert, Head Majorette, Savannah, 
Georgia. 

— — - 





Percussion (Drums and Woodwind) 
Section — Left to right, kneeling: John- 
nie Luke, Walter Holt, Michael Brown, 
Robert Baker, Alto Fudge, Edward 
Stephens, Arthur Smalls, and Edward 
Williams. Standing: Bernard Rosser, 
Clark Lucky, Marion May. 



12 



Drum Majorettes — Left to right: Thorn- 
asina Jenkins, Savannah, Georgia; Lu- 
cille Brock, Savannah, Georgia; and 
Delores Dempsey, Savannah, Georgia. 



Brass Section—Left to right: Thomi 

Beck, Grady Riggs, James Thompso. 

Melvin Washington, Beverly Wallac 

Clarence Byrd, and Paul Johnson, 



I 



We parted; months and years rolled by; 
We met again four summers after: 

Our parting ivas all sob and sigh; 

Our meeting was all mirth and laughter: 

For in my heart's most secret cell 

There had been many secret lodgers: 

And she was not the ball-room's belle, 
But only — Mrs. Something Rogers! 

Winthrop Mackworth Praed 



CAMPUS SCENES 




Technical Science Building — Houses Engineering 

Technology, Chemistry, Reading Clinic and rooms for 

general classroom instruction. 





New Classroom Building to Be Constructed 




Library — The Center of Instructional Programs 




Meldrim Hall — The Administration Headquarters, 
Auditorium and Classrooms. 




New Women's Dormitory 



~ 



13 



ACTIVITIES 





The speed with which our moments fly; 
I sigh not over vanished years, 

But watch the years that hasten by, 

Bryant, "The Lapse of Time" 



SSC's First Family — Left to right: Mrs. 

Howard Jordan, Jr., Miss Judith Jordan, 

and Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 




Installation Service of the Officers for Camilla Hubert 
Hall — Left to right: Mrs. Howard Jordan, Jr. administers 
the installation of the following officers: Jeanette Moore, 
President; Paulette Johnson, Vice President; Vivian Ran- 
son, Secretary; and Rosa Hogans, Assistant Secretary. 



Receiving Line During Freshman Orientation Week — Left 
to right: Mrs. Robert Reid; Dr. Robert Reid, Dean of 
Faculty; Mrs. Howard Jordan, Jr.; and Dr. Howard Jor- 
dan, Jr., President of SSC. 








Brothers Meet at College Program — Rev. Harry Nevels, 

former editor-in-chief, Tiger's Roar, and James Nevels, 

educator and former news editor of Tiger's Roar. 




Dr. Patricia Harris, Professor of Law, Howard Univer- 
sity, August 1964 Commencement Speaker, and Dr. How- 
ard Jordan, Jr., President, Savannah State College, con- 
versing with parents after commencement. 



14 



Nothing is swifter than the years. 



ACTIVITIES 



Ovid 





Neivly appointed Dean of Faculty, 
Dr. Robert D. Reid. 



Timothy U. Ryals, a graduate of 

SSC, delivering the main address 

at the Annual Alumni Banquet. 




imy Stepherson, President 
f SSC's Student Council. 



Leroy Bolden, Alumnus and 
Manager of Yamacraiv Vil- 
lage, speaks at the Annual 
Mens Festival. 



Students studying chemical laboratory experiments. 




Student Laboratory Technicians receiving instructions 

from Dr. Charles Pratt, Chairman, Department of 

Chemistry. 



/.,,«:vr ! ::! 




Dr. Hoivard Jordan, Jr., President of SSC, greets Miss National 
Alumni 1963-64, Mrs. Ora M. Washington, a native of Sparta, Geor- 
gia.; and attendants, Mrs. Velma Zeiler, a native of Savannah, Geor- 
gia; and Mrs. Florence Wells, a native of Statesboro, Georgia. 



THE YEAR'S END 

Full happy is the man who comes at last 

Into the safe completion of his year; 
Weathered the perils of his spring, that blast 
How many blossoms promising and dear! 
And of his summer with dread passions 
fraught 
That oft, like fire through the ripening corn, 
Blight all with mocking death and leave dis- 
traught 
Loved ones to mourn the ruined waste 
forlorn. 
But now, though autumn gave but harvest 
slight, 
Oh, grateful is he to the powers above 
For winter's sunshine, and the lengthened 
night 
By hearth-side genial with the warmth of 
love. 
Through silvered days of vistar gold and 
green 
Contentedly he glides away, serene, 

Timothy Cole 





Miss Alumni and Attendants, Savannah 
Chapter — Left to right: Mrs. Mattie B. 
Collins; Miss Alumni, Miss Bernice Wes- 
ley; and Mrs. Rose Mary Banks. 



Miss National Alumni and Attendants, Washington, D. C. Chan 

Left to right: Mary Lee; Miss National Alumni, Mary F. Robi 

and Rosemary Singleton. 





Miss Rosemary Singleton, at- 
tendant to Miss National 
Alumni, Washington, D. C. 



Mrs. Mary B. Lee, attendant 

to Miss National Alumni, is 

treasurer of the Washington, 

D. C. Chapter. 



Miss Mary F. Robinson, Miss 
National Alumni, is the re- 
cording secretary for the 
Washington, D. C. Chapter. 



Prince K. Mitchell, Act 
Alumni Secretary. 



16 



■H^^m 



Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics 

Dr. Elmer Dean, Chairman 

Mr. Vernon C. Clay 

Mrs. Ella Fisher 

Mr. B. J. James 

Mr. Wesley L. Johnson, Jr. 

Mr. Charles Day 

Mr. Robert Saxby 

Committee on Homecoming 



Mr. Frank D. Tharpe, Chairman 

Mrs. Geraldine Abernathy 

Mrs. Martha Avery 

Mr. Leroy Brown 

Mrs. Ella Fisher 

Mr. Samuel Gill 

Mrs. Farnese Lumpkin 

Mrs. Luetta C. Milledge 

Mr. Robert Pindar 

Mr. Wilton C. Scott 

Dr. Willie G. Tucker 

Miss Sherbie Best 

Mr. Charles Hall 

Miss Freda Hunter 

Mr. Ernest Lavender 

Miss Alice Murray 

Mr. Robert Patrick 

Miss Mary Smith 



Mr. Eugene Jackson, Vice Chairman 
Mr. Felix Alexis 
Miss Albertha Boston 
Mrs. Madeline Dixon 
Mr. J. Randolph Fisher- 
Mr. Phillip Hampton 
Mr. Prince Mitchell 
Mr. Robert Mobley 
Mr. Wiley Perdue 
Miss Martha Stafford 
Dr. John L. Wilson 
Mr. Thomas Clark 
Miss Irene Elmore 
Mr. Bryan Jackson 
Mr. Willie B. Michael 
Mr. Lessie Owens 
Miss Gertrude Richardson 
Mr. Jimmy Stepherson 



T-V- 






SAT1HVAH STATE COLLEGE 

Savannah, Georgia 

Johnny Sears, Tiger Guard 






" 




r t 



George Lane, Tiger Center 




Arts Building 






/ 1 aT\ 




1964-65 

Athletic Handbook 
For Press, Radio and Television 



s 








SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
Athletic Officials 

Athletic Director Albert E. Frazier 

Chairman of Dept. of Physical Education and 

Recreation Dr. Raymond W. Hopson 

Head Football and Basketball Coach Leo Richardson 

Assistant Football Coaches Richard Washington, Frank Simmons, 
John Mason 

Track Coach Richard Washington 

Chairman of Faculty Committee on Athletics Elmer J. Dean 

Comptroller Wesley L. Johnson, Jr. 

Public Relations Director, Director of Athletic 

Publicity, and Student Publications Wilton C! Scott 

Alumni Secretary Prince Mitchell 

Editor Robert L. Joiner, Jr. 

Trainer Roscoe Edwards 

Sports Writer and Statistician Dennis Polite 

Football Game Announcer Kharn Collier 

Football Game Spotter Lucius Baldwin 



Facts About SSC 

President Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

School Enrollment 1,379 

Colors Blue and Orange 

Mascot Tiger 

Athletic Conferences NCAA, NAIA, and Southeastern 

Campus Queen Irene Elmore, Business Major, Savannah, Georgia 

President of Student Council Jimmy Stepherson 

Alma Mater Hymn "We Hail Thee SSC" 



.^———^ ^_ _^_^_ ^^™ 




Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., was appointed President of Savannah State College 
by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia on September 11, 
1963. He moved his family to Savannah and took office officially on November 
1, 1963. 

A native of Beaufort, South Carolina, he is married to the former Ruth 
Menafee of Voorhees Junior College, Denmark, South Carolina. They have one 
daughter, Judith Louise, a freshman at Fisk University. 

Dr. Jordan attended the public schools of Beaufort, South Carolina, where he 
graduated from Robert Smalls High School. He did his college work at Georgia 
State College (now Savannah State College) and South Carolina State College, 
receiving the A.B. degree from the latter with a major in education and a minor 
in biology. His graduate work for the master's degree was done at Howard 
University, Washington, D. C. He received the Ed.D. degree in the field of 
Educational Psychology from New York University. 

While at New York University, Dr. Jordan studied with the distinguished 
educational psychologist, Dr. Charles H. Skinner, who served as Chairman of his 
Sponsoring Committee and also supervised his research. The title of his disserta- 
tion is, THE CONTENT OF AN INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN EDUCA- 
TIONAL PSYCHOLOGY IN TEACHER'S COLLEGES AS DETERMINED BY 
A CRITICAL ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION OF CONTEMPORARY TEXT- 
BOOKS IN THE FIELD. 

As Chairmari of the Department of Education; Dean of the School of Edu- 
cation; and Dean of the Faculty at South Carolina State College; Dr. Jordan 
worked with the State Department of Education in promoting programs of teacher 
education and certification in the State of South Carolina. He is well-known to 
teacher groups throughout the State of South Carolina, Georgia, and the Southeast, 
having served as consultant for county education associations, commencement 
speaker, organizer of high school testing programs, and consultant for various 
professional organizations. In addition, he engages in many civic activities. 

In religious activities, he is an Episcopalian. Among the professional organi- 
zations in which Dr. Jordan holds membership are the following: Phi Delta Kappa 
Honor Society, American Psychological Association, Department of Education, 
N.E.A., American Council on Education, National Society for the Study of Educa- 
tion, Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society, Department of Audio-Visual Education, 
N.E.A., and American Teachers Association. 

Dr. Jordan is a veteran of World War II, and served as an officer in the 
European Theatre of Operations. 





Chairman, Department of Physical Education 






■> 





RAYMOND W. HOPSON 



A native of Englewood, New 
Jersey, Hopson is beginning his 
eighth year as Chairman. As a col- 
legian, he participated in track, 
basketball, football, and baseball. 

Prior to joining the staff as chair- 
man, Hopson served as chairman of 
the graduate department of Physical 
Education at North Carolina College. 

In addition to the B.S. degree from 
Hampton Institute, he holds the 
master's degree and Ph.D. degree 
from Ohio State University. 




Athletic Director 




ALBERT E. FRAZIER 

A native of Savannah, Georgia, 
Frazier is beginning his third year 
as director and sixteenth year as a 
member of the SSC faculty. 

He played football at Tuskegee In- 
stitute, where he received his B.S. 
degree. He later received the master's 
degree from Arizona State College. 

Before becoming athletic director, 
Frazier served as assistant football 
coach. 







<H 




SSC's COACHING STAFF. Left to right, Richard Washington, 
Defensive Coach; Leo Richardson, Head Coach; Frank Simmons, 
Line Coach; and John Mason, Offensive Coach. 





SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE FOOTBALL 



Savannah 
State College 



8 



*Edward Waters College 



Opponent 

. .24 






0. 



Fort Valley State College 32 




20 Morris College 



6 Clark College 



33 



34 



* Albany State College 23 




Mississippi Vocational College 53 



26 



*Claflin College 



*Conference Games 



A/L 





Dennis Davis (31); Freshman; 510"; 
170 pounds; graduated from Carver 
High School, Miami, Florida. Davis 
possesses excellent leadership ability. 



trtf? 



V 







Harold Singleton (88); Sophomore; 
6'2"; 165 pounds; graduated from 
Tompkins High School, Savannah, 
Georgia. Singleton has excellent cour- 
age and is very dependable. 




Arts Building". 



:\ ; ' 






William Hardy (14); Freshman; 
5'8"; 165 pounds; graduated from 
Johnson High School, Savannah, 
Georgia. Hardy, according to other 
Fullbacks, is very small, but does an 
excellent job. 









Vaughn Ford (10); 510"; 165 
pounds; attended Gilbert High School, 
Jacksonville, Florida. Despite his 
height, Ford has developed into a 
very good quarterback. 





Bobby Carter (71); 5'9"; 210 pounds; 
attended Sol Johnson High School, 
Savannah, Georgia. "Short Stuff," as 
he is called, is one of the finest foot- 
ball players on the team. 





Frank Ellis (12); 510"; 170 pounds; 
graduated from Sol Johnson High 
School, Savannah, Georgia. Ellis has 
been the most versatile and depend- 
able athlete on the football team. 



wmmm 





Al Sears (63); 6'3"; graduated from 
Sol Johnson High School, Savannah, 
Georgia. Al is the brother of the best 
football player, John Sears. Al is a 
very fine player. 




■.%■ 




Carl Westmore (33); 511"; gradu- 
ated from Tinoli High School, Defu- 
niak, Florida. Westmore, a freshman, 
is the best offensive Halfback on the 
team. 



Samuel Marshall (15); Freshman; 
511"; 165 pounds; is a graduate of 
Parker High School, Birmingham, Ala- 
bama. 










CENTERS 

Stokes, Joseph 
German, William 
Bush, Johnnie 
Simmons, Willie 
HALFBACKS 
Hardy, William 
Woods, James . 
Davis, Kenneth 
Davis, Dennis . 
Westmore, Carl 
Marshall, Samuel 
Ferguson, Charles 
Cunningham, Paul 
Hickson, William 
Witherspoon, Lewi 
FULLBACKS 
Blakeney, Joseph 
Caulden, William 
Spencer, Robert 
QUARTERBACKS 
Ellis, Frank . . 
Burke, Jimmy 
Ford, Vaughn 
Fulton, Walter 



19 

n; 
i') 

17 
L8 
L8 
L9 
20 
23 
17 

22 
18 
13 

20 
19 
17 

17 



. . . . 6'1" .... 185 . 
. . . . 5'9" .... 175 . 
. . . . 5'11" ... 172 . 

. ... 9»9%". ... 178 . 

. . . . 5'8" .... 160 . 
6'0" .... 160 . 
. . 5'9" .... 170 . 
. . . 5'10" .... 168 . 
. . . . 5'11" .... 175 . 
. . . . 5'10" .... 165 . 
. . . . 5'10" .... 175 . 
. ... 5'9" .... 195 . 
. . . . 6'1" .... 180 . 
. . . . 5'11" .... 170 . 

. . . . 5'10" .... 195 . 
. . . . 57" ... 175 . 
.... 5'11" ... 185 

. . . . 5' 10" .... 165 . 

. . . . 6'2" .... 170 . 

. . . 5'9" .... 165 . 

. . 6'4" .... 170 . 





Hometowi 

Johnson Savannah! 

Johnson Savannah! 

Johnson Savannah 

St. Helena Frogmorej 

Central Palatka 

Johnson Savannah 

Trenton Trenton 

Carver Miami 

Tinoli Defuniak 

Parker Birmingham 

Central Newark 

Steuhenville .... Steubenville 

Laney Augusta 

Brown Charleston 

Simon Gratz . . . Waynesboro 

Monitor Fitzgerald 

Richardson Lake City 

Johnson Savannah 

Johnson Savannah 

Gilbert Jacksonville 

Anderson Jacksonville 



10 




Name 
SNDS 

ord, Herbert 21 

la-wls, Oree 22 

Mitchell, John 18 

ingleton, Harold ... 19 

"Jance, Terry 17 

CACKLES 

xwis, Bernard 23 

barter, Bobby 20 

ones, Winston 18 

lingley, Allen 17 

landy, William .... 18 

iuthland, Charles . . 18 



. . . . 6'1" . . 


. . 170 


. . . . 6'1" . . 


. . 190 . . . . 


. . . . 6'0" . . 


. 150 . . . . 


. . . . 6'2" . . 


. . 160 . . . . 


. . . . 6'2" . . 


. . 181 . . . . 



. . . . 6T" . . 


. . 228 . . . . 


. . . . 5'9" . . 


. . 210 


. . . . 6'3" . . 


. 200 . . . . 


. . . . 6'2" . . 


. . 200 


. . . . 5'11" . . 


. . 206 . . . . 


. . . . 6'2" . . 


. . 229 . . . . 



GUARDS 

Villiam, Charles . 
)orsey, Freddie . 

" >ears, Al 

iears, Johnny . . . 
>elly, Steven . . . . 
tdams, Reginald 
ohnson, George . 
Jell, Robert 



18 

18 

17 
20 
18 
18 
21 
21 



. . . 5'3" . . 
. . . 5'9" . . 
. . . 6'3" . . 
. . . 5'10" . . 
. . . 6'0" . . 
... 6'2%".. 
. . . 5'11" . . 
. . . 57" . . 


. . 170 
.. 176 
. . 193 
. . 173 
.. 190 
. . 202 
. . 224 
. . 165 





Johnson Savannah 

Center Waycross 

Johnson Savannah 

Tompkins Savannah 

West Side Anderson 

Steubenville .... Steubenville 

Johnson Savannah 

Richardson Lake City 

Johnson Savannali 

Johnson Savannah 

Drew Winter Garden 

Howard - Georgetown 

Central Palatka 

Johnson Savannah 

Johnson Savannah 

Northwestern Miami 

Jones Orlando 

Jones Orlando 

Diekerson Vidalia 



11 











SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE BASKETBALL 
1964-65 Schedule 

HOME 

December 8 Area Trade 

December 10 Florida Memorial 

January 8 Bethune Cookman 

January 9 South Carolina State 

January 12 Albany State 

January 16 Fort Valley State 

January 25 Morris College 

January 30 Paine College 

February 6 Edward Waters 

February 9 Benedict College 

AWAY 

December 1 South Carolina State 

December 3 Bethune Cookman 

December 4 Florida Memorial 

January 15 Area Trade 

January 18 Fort Valley State 

January 22 Albany State 

January 27 Morris College 

January 28 Benedict College 

February 13 Paine College 

February 17 Edward Waters 

February 20 Fort Valley State 

All home games will be played at Wiley Gymnasium. 

12 



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BASKETBALL 





v_A Jv 



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A. 



Front: Jennings, Caine, Brady. Middle: Booker, Bowman, Ful- 
ton, Baker, Burke. Back: Dious, Davis, Lane, Johnson, Day, Brooks; 
Leo Richardson, Coach. 

1964-65 Varsity Roster (Numerical) 



Number 



Na 



Position Height Weight 



Hometown 



20 Walter Fulton Center 6'4" 180 Jacksonville 

21 Wayne Brady Guard 6'1" 180 Chicago 

22 Charles Day Center 6'3" 180 Savannah 

23 Tommie Davis Guard 6'1" 170 Columbus 

25 Verner Jennings Guard 5'9" 154 Savannah 

30 Jerome Johnson Forward 6'2" 195 Chicago 

31 Clark Brooks Forward 6'3%". . . 200 Chicago 

32 Jimmy Burke Center 6'2" 170 Savannah 

34 George Lane Center 6'5" 205 Chicago 

35 Theodore Bowman Center 6'3" 170 Augusta 

41 Robert Caine Forward 6'4" 180 Brunswick 

43 Clyde Baker Guard 6'0" 160 Toledo 

44 Ronald Booker Guard 6'0" 155 ...... Savannah 

45 Kenneth Dious Guard 6'2" 185 Athens 



13 





22— Charles Day: 611', 180 lbs., 
junior. 

Day is an honor student from Beach 
High School, Savannah, Georgia. He 
is 20 years of age. 



■'* **.**►': : 








20— Walter Fulton: 
freshman. 



6'4", 190 lbs. 



As an all-city basketball player dur- 
ing high school, Fulton was an out- 
standing player. "Bug," as he is 
called, is expected to give the Tigers 
the extra broad strength needed. 



23— Tommie Davis: 61", 170 lbs., 
senior. 

Davis, sometimes called "TD," is 
from Spencer High School, Columbus, 
Georgia. He is 22 years old. 



14 



$ 







35— Theodore Bowman: 6'3", 170 lbs. 
junior. 

Bowman is a 19-year-old Lucy La- 
ney High School graduate. 



31— -Clark Brooks: 6'3%", 200 lbs., 
sophomore. 

Brooks is from John Marshall High 
School. "Hesitation," as he is called, 
is 19 years old. 



30 — Jerome Johnson: 6'2", 195 lbs,, 
junior. 

Johnson is a graduate of Crane High 
School. He is 21 years of age. 



15 






^SJHffS^^S^SS^S^Si 



,;;,> 




25 — Verner Jennings: 5'9", 154 lbs., 
freshman. 

Jennings is an excellent ball- 
handler and shows good potential, 
especially for offense. 



; >**;W: :■ 






43— Clyde Baker: 6', 160 lbs., sopho- 
more. 

While at Scott High School, Baker 
received honorable mention. He is 
called "Lefty," and is 19 years old. 



21_Wayne Brady: 61", 180 lbs., 
freshman. 

"Quick Dog," as he is called, is a 
19-year-old Harrison High School 
graduate. 



16 



^HH 



I 




41— Robert Caine: 6'4", 180 lbs., 
senior. 

Caine is at home with the track 
team as well as basketball team. He 
is a 21-year-old Risley High School 
graduate. 



45 — Kenneth Dious: 
freshman. 

Dious is a graduate of Athens High 
School. He is 18 years of age. 





The Savannah State College Track Team, coached by Richard K. 
Washington, anticipates a successful year. 

The members of the track team are: Robert Caine, Captain; 
Robert Miller. Jerome Johnson, Benny Brown. Benjamin Lee, Brad- 
ford, Torain, Jesse Hagen. Woodrow Billups. Johnny Sears, Edgar 
Jones, Tommie Davis, Charles Childers, Howard Johnson, and Earl 
McCullins. 

The team was second place runner-up in the 1963-1964 conference 
track meet. Shown in the picture is the second place trophy. 

Except for a few losses through graduation, the team expects a 
successful year. 




18 




EDITOR'S MESSAGE 

This booklet was prepared to assist you in covering 
various sports activities at Savannah State College. We 
have included, also, facts about Savannah State College 
that will enable you to become even more familiar with 
the school itself. 

Stories of each game will be sent to local newspapers. 

For additional, feel free to call upon Wilton C. Scott, 
Director of Public Relations, Savannah State College, 
Savannah, Georgia. 

Sportfully yours, 
ROBERT L. JOINER, JR. 



19 









FACTS ABOUT SSC 

Savannah State College, is located off Taylor Road and Falligant 
Avenue, in the historic city of Savannah, Georgia, which is the oldest 
city and chief seaport of the state, as well as the first capital. 

The campus, comprising one hundred acres, presents a setting 
of matchless natural beauty. Among the more outstanding buildings 
are: Camilla Hubert Hall, Adams Hall, and Meldrim Hall, consisting 
of administrative offices, the auditorium, and classrooms. 

There are several new buildings on the campus, which include: 
a million-dollar technical science building; a half-million dollar library; 
Wiley Gymnasium: R. Wright Hall; a sewage disposal system, and a 
heating plant. A dormitory to house 100 women students was opened 
at the beginning of the Fall Quarter, 1964. 

The College now includes six divisions and 14 departments which 
give students a wide variety of courses from which to select. The 
major divisions are Business Administration, Education, Humanities, 
Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, and Technical Sciences. Through 
the offerings of these divisions, students may prepare for varied careers 
in the area of art, modern foreign language, English and literature, 
biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics, physical education, home 
economics, music, history, economics, sociology, political science, 
engineering technology, and industrial education. 




20 



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The Savannah State College Bulletin 

President Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations and 

Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Scott 

Acting Alumni Secretary Prince K. Mitchell 

Issue Editor Carolyn R. Screen 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Volume XVIII May, 1965 Number 6 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly 
in October, December, February, March, April, and May by 
Savannah State College. Second Class mail privileges au- 
thorized at Savannah, Georgia. 



George Washington Carver Scorned Wealth 
While Creating Multi-Million Dollar Industries 



While creating multi-million dollar 
industries by his experiments with pea- 
nuts, soy beans and other farm products, 
George Washington Carver refused any 
increase in his $125-a-month starting 
salary during his 46 years on the 
Tuskegee Institute faculty. 

This is revealed by Lawrence Elliott 
in "Beyond Fame or Fortune," a new 
biography of the famous Negro scientist, 
published in the May Reader's Digest. 

Often he delayed cashing his salary 
checks until the treasurer protested and 
frequently he gave them to needy stu- 
dents. He refused to go to work for 
Thomas Edison at $100,000 a year. A 
dyestuffs firm offered Carver a labora- 
tory and a blank check. He sent back 
the check with formulas for 536 dyes 
that he had discovered. 

When Florida peanut planters sent a 
box of diseased specimens with a check 
and offer of a retainer, he diagnosed 
the disease and returned the check. "If 
the good Lord charged nothing to grow 
your peanuts," he wrote, "I do not think 
it fitting of me to charge anything for 
curing them." 

Spurred by Carver's research, Ameri- 
ca's peanut crop, Elliott writes, today is 
our sixth most important agricultural 
product. The two billion pounds har- 
vested each year are worth close to 300 
million dollars to the farmer and 
another 200 million to industry. 

In addition to the admiration of 
scientists everywhere, Carver won the 
friendship of Presidents Theodore 
Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge and Franklin 
D. Roosevelt, and also of Henry Ford, 
the industrialist. Ford and Carver 
visited each other for years and Ford 
named a Dearborn school for him. 

Three years before he died on Jan. 
5, 1942, Carver, who never married, 
gave his life savings of $33,000 to the 
Carver Foundation to provide more 
facilities at Tuskegee for research. Other 
gifts followed and the Foundation now 
has a two-million dollar building. 

Congress passed unanimously a bill 
by Sen. Harry S. Truman creating the 
George Washington Carver National 
Monument on the site of the farm near 
Diamond Grove, Mo., where Carver was 
born a slave in 1862. 




Mr. William N. Weston, an Aero-Space Tech- 
nologist at Goddard Space Flight Center, is a 
1956 graduate of Savannah State College. He 
serves as Project Leader for the Spacecraft Track- 
ing, Input Analysis and Predictions Programming 
Group. He is a member of the Washington, D. C. 
Chapter of Savannah State. 



14th Annual Honors 
Convocation Held in January 

The 14th Annual Honors Convocation 
was held at Savannah State College on 
Wednesday, January 20, 1965. The 
Honors Address was delivered by Dr. 
John A. Hunter, President of Louisiana 
State University. 

Dr. Hunter, a native of Donner, 
Louisiana, is well known in educational 
circles, especially among education ad- 
ministrators and teachers in Louisiana. 
He is a graduate of Davidson College, 
North Carolina, and received the Master 
of Arts degree at L.S.U., the Ph.D. de- 
gree following an exhaustive study of 
the legal status and social composition 
of Louisiana parish school boards. The 
convocation program began at 10:20 
a.m., in Willcox Gymnasium. 

The officers and members of Alpha 
Nu Chapter of Alpha Kappa Mu Honor 
Society are as follows: President, Miss 
Hazel Johnson; Vice President, Miss 
Willie M. Julian; Secretary-Treasurer, 
Mrs. Mildred Glover; Mrs. Juliette B. 
Mitchell; J. B. Clemmons, Advisor; 
E. K. Williams, Advisor and Director of 
Region V; Faculty members: Dr. 
Howard Jordan, Jr., Johnny Campbell, 
Jr., Mrs. Mildred Glover, Robert Holt, 
Dr. Howard M. Jason, John W. Jordan, 



Miss Marcelle Rhodriquez, Mrs. Mar- 
garet C. Robinson, and Dr. Forrest 0. 
Wiggins. 

Candidates for Alpha Kappa Mu 
Honor Society were: Miss Louise M. 
Tarber, and Bradford Torain. 

Officers of Beta Kappa Chi National 
Scientific Society are: Jimmy Stepher- 
son, President; Corine Capers, Vice 
President; Shirley Cruse, Secretary; 
Dennis Polite, Treasurer. 

Faculty members: C. V. Clay, Spon- 
sor; J. B. Clemmons, B. T. Griffith, and 
W. V. Winters. 

Initiates for Beta Kappa Chi were: 
Phillip Dryer, Willie N. Fuller, Miss 
Betty Gordon, and Jeffery James. 



62 Students Make 
Dean's Faculty List 

According to Dr. Robert D. Reid, 
Dean of Faculty at Savannah State 
College, 62 students have attained an 
average of 3.50 or higher on a full pro- 
gram during the winter quarter 1965, 
and have earned a place on the Dean's 
List for the spring quarter 1965. The 
names of these students are listed below. 

Richard Anderson, Carol J. Brannan, 
Helen J. Brunson, Johnnie Bryant, 
Corine Capers, Shirley Ann Conner, 
Laura Corbett, Mabel Corouthers, 
Shirley Ann Cruse, Arthur C. Curtright, 
Johnny J. Davis, Marva Deloach, Ivory 
K. Dious, Dorothy Dorsey, Gloria A. 
Duncan, Charles Elmore, Cora M. 
Foston, Gwendolyn Fuller, Betty J. 
Gordon, Laura M. Grant, Sandra Hey- 
ward, Georgia Hightower, Dawn 
Hollingshead, Minnie Hudson, Roxcena 
Jackson, Catherine Johnson, Hazel John- 
son, Willie M. Johnson, Lillie M. Kyles, 
John E. Lang, and Barbara Lawson. 

Hewitt Lundy, Joanne V. Mainor, 
Glennera Martin, William H. Martin, 
Bertha R. Mays, Vivian McMillan, 
Josephine McPherson, Juliette B. 
Mitchell, Willie F. Moore, Lydia 
Mungin, Marion Mungin, Rose New- 
some, Waltina Reddick, Grady Riggs, 
Carolyn Roberts, Jacquelyn Ryan, 
Patricia A. Ryan, Jacqueline Ryles, 
Delacy Sanford, Charles Savage, 
Doretha Scott, Gwendolyn Sharpe, 
Margie Simmons, Emily Tait, Minnie 
Thompson, Brenda Truedell, Eugene 
Washington, Joyce Washington, Ollie 
M. Wells, Maggie Wicker, and Winfrey 
Laordice. 



Committee Evaluates Program of Teacher 
Education; College Program Approved 



A visiting committee evaluated the 
program of teacher education at Savan- 
nah State College on April 11-14, 1965. 
The committee, composed of a cross- 
section of professional educators, was 
organized by the Division of Instruction 
of the State Department of Education. 

The evaluation was a prerequisite to 
the achievement of regular state ac- 
creditation. This form of accreditation, 
called the Approved Program Approach 
to Certification, is a relatively new 
process which is increasingly being 
adopted by state certifying agencies. 

Programs approved as a result of this 
visitation were approved for five years 
instead of the usual one year. For this 
reason, regular accreditation is officially 
termed Five Year Approval. Students 
who begin as freshmen during the next 
five years will, upon completion of their 
particular teaching programs, auto- 
matically be granted professional certifi- 
cation. 

Members of the Visiting Committee 
were as follows: 

Dr. Catherine J. Duncan Berry, Head, 
Dept. of Education, Fort Valley State 
College, Fort Valley, Georgia. 

Dr. Joseph Dennis, Mathematics 
Dept., Clark College, Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. L. Farmer, S. H. Archer High 
School, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Mrs. Mattie Greenwood, Art Con- 
sultant, Area I, Atlanta City School 
System. 

Clifford Hardwick, Consultant in 
Science, Chatham County Schools, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia. 

Miss Iris Dukes, Chatham County 
Board of Education, Savannah, Georgia. 

Dr. James Marquis, Head, Music 
Dept., Albany State College, Albany, 
Georgia. 

Dr. Chester Robinson, Head, Dept. of 
Health and Physical Education, Fort 
Valley State College, Fort Valley, Geor- 
gia. 

Dr. Mary Tingle, College of Educa- 
tion, University of Georgia, Athens, 
Georgia. 

James Wykle, Head, Business Educa- 
tion Services, State Dept. of Education, 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

Dr. Henry L. Ashmore, President, 
Armstrong State College, Savannah, 
Georgia, Chairman of the Committee. 



Miss Olleen Williams, State Dept. of 
Education, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Miss Hassie McElveen, Georgia South- 
ern College, Statesboro, Georgia. 

Miss Mary Ellen Perkins, Coordinator, 
Teacher Education Services, State Dept. 
of Education, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Dr. Hayden C. Bryant, Division of 
Instruction, State Department of Edu- 
cation. 

Mrs. Maenelle D. Dempsey, Teacher 
Education Consultant, State Dept. of 
Education, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Dell Knight, Chatham County Board 
of Education, Savannah, Georgia. 



Graduate Accepts 
Job With the USAF 

Percy L. Byrd, a 1961 mathematics 
graduate of Savannah State College, has 
recently been employed by the United 
States Air Force Aeronautical Chart and 
Information Center. He is enrolled in 
the Cartographer Training Program be- 
ing conducted at ACIC's training school 
in St. Louis, Missouri. 

This six month Civil Service Commis- 
sion approved course provides a broad 
background in chart compilation and 
related fields. Subjects covered in the 
curriculum include geodesy ( making 
exact measurement of the earth', 
astronomy, physical geography and 
photogrammetry ( making charts from 
photographs) . 

When Mr. Byrd completes the course, 
he will be assigned to the Production 
and Distribution Plant of ACIC located 
in St. Louis, Missouri, at the historic 
site of the St. Louis Arsenal on Second 
and Arsenal Street. 

Its mission is basically the production 
of aeronautical charts, graphic air target 
materials, flight information publica- 
tions, maps, terrain models, evaluated 
intelligence on air facilities, and related 
cartographic devices for the United 
States Air Force and other Department 
of Defense Agencies. 

Mr. Byrd was formerly employed by 
the Mcintosh County Board of Educa- 
tion as principal of Sapelo Island Ele- 
mentary and Junior High School. 

He is married to the former Lucile 
Lawton. They have one son, Craig. 







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Miss Rosemary Singleton is a secretary for the 
Interior Department, Bureau of Mines Office of 
Mineral Reports, Washington, D. C. She is a 1961 
graduate of Savannah State College, major, Busi- 
ness Administration. She worked as Secretary in 
Public Relations Office and Office of Home Study 
for 15 months after graduating. She is a member 
of the Washington, D. C. chapter of the Alumni 
Association. 

SSC Holds Conference; 
Teacher Education Day 

Savannah State College held its Fifth 
Annual Teacher Education Day Con- 
ference on April 22, 1965. The theme 
of the conference was, "Creating In- 
telligence." This theme was of particular 
importance at this time as its meanings 
were centered about the whole complex 
of problems associated with the "Cul- 
turally Deprived." 

The Chief Consultant and Keynote 
Speaker was Dr. Arthur Coombs, Pro- 
fessor of Education, University of 
Florida. Dr. Coombs is most outstanding 
in the field of professional education. 
His research and writings in this field 
have earned for him an enviable 
scholarly reputation. 

The Teacher Education Day Confer- 
ence was a unique activity in that it was 
a venture which was jointly organized 
and operated by the College and the 
staffs of the public school systems that 
cooperate in the program of teacher 
education. Leadership roles incident to 
operation of the conference were shared 
by College and public school personnel. 

The conference was open to the 
public. The first general session began 
at 9 a.m. At 10:30 a.m., the conference 
divided into small study groups which 
deliberated against the backdrop of the 
Keynote Presentation. The final general 
session began at 1:30 p.m., and con- 
cluded at 3 p.m. At this session, the 
groups reported the highlights of their 
deliberations, followed by an evaluative 
summary by Dr. Coombs. 



4 



Progress at SSC — 14% Enrollment Increase; 
$1,500,000 Under Construction and Planned 



Enrollment at Savannah State Col- 
lege, said President Howard Jordan, 
has increased steadily for the last two 
years. If the present trend continues, 
the college will have 2,500 students by 
1970, provided facilities are available 
to accommodate them. 

This year the enrollment was 1,298. 
This figure is 13.8 per cent higher than 
anything the college has ever had. The 
freshman class is 35 per cent larger than 
any first class the college has had. 

In the area of construction, three 
buildings are now being built. These in- 
clude a classroom building, a dormitory 
for 180 women and gymnasium. All 
three contracts for these structures were 
awarded to Savannah firms. 

Classroom Building 

The two-story classroom building, 
which will cost $500,000, will be air- 
conditioned and will consist of 15 gen- 
eral purpose classrooms, data processing 
facilities, a language laboratory, a read- 
ing clinic and an administrative area 
with office space for 33 instructors. 

Rives Worrell Co., of Savannah is the 
contractor. 

The dormitory will have 90 bedrooms 
of the studio type, housing two girls to 
a room. It will also have a lobby, 
recreational areas, an apartment for a 
house director, a grooming room, a tele- 
vision room and a laundromat. It will 
be air-conditioned and cost approxi- 
mately $600,000. Jim Artley Company 
of Savannah is the contractor. 

The Wiley Gymnasium Annex, costing 
$418,000, will include classrooms for 
health and physical education students, 
additional spectator seating for indoor 
sports and a regulation AAU swimming 
pool. Rives Worrell is the contractor. 

The future in construction is very 
bright, Dr. Jordan said. 

Fine Arts Building 

Preliminary plans have been approved 
for a music and fine arts building which 
will include areas for art, drama, music 
and the other performing arts, he said. 

This building will be on the west end 
of the campus towards LaRoche 
Avenue. The budgeted cost of this build- 
ing is $542,000 and construction is ex- 
pected to start in early spring. Oscar 
Hansen is the architect. 

In the planning stages, Dr. Jordan 
said, are a dorm for 180 men which 
will be similar to the one being con- 
structed for women. The firm of Sewell 



and Associates is designing the build- 
ing, which will cost about $600,000. 

The total teaching staff is now 73 
with 21 faculty members holding doc- 
torate degrees and all others with 
master's degrees with the exception of 
three persons in the areas of art and 
technical sciences. These persons are 
actively working towards completing 
requirements for master's degrees. 

Work for Doctorates 

Also Dr. Jordan said, a majority of 
those persons with master's degrees 
have done work towards their doc- 
torates. Five staff members are presently 
on leave to complete requirements for 
their doctorates. 

SSC has the nucleus of a good teach- 
ing staff, Dr. Jordan said. Each major 
division is headed by a person with an 
earned doctorate and the same is true 
of all departments with the exception 
of the departments of math, physics and 
home economics. 

Rut each department except home 
economics has a person in it with a 
doctorate degree engaged in full-time 
teaching, he said. 

"We feel fortunate," he said, in secur- 
ing 13 new members of the faculty who 
are all well qualified. Five of this num- 
ber hold doctorate degrees, he said. 



Savannah State Implements 
Work-Study Program 

President Howard Jordan, Jr., of Sa- 
vannah State College has been officially 
notified by the Bureau of Higher Edu- 
cation of the Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare that the col- 
lege's application for a Work-Study Pro- 
gram under Title 1-C of the Economic 
Opportunity Act has been approved. 

Savannah State College will receive 
an initial federal allotment to cover the 
cost of providing additional part-time 
campus jobs for eligible students. This 
allotment will be matched by the col- 
lege's ten per cent contribution, as 
stipulated in the Economic Opportunity 
Act. The college has been authorized to 
initiate the employment program on or 
after January 25, 1965. 

Many students will receive campus 
employment as a result of the federal 
allocation. Students who are assigned 
part-time campus jobs must be in good 
academic standing and demonstrate 
need. 



For the first time in America's his- 
tory, states may spend more money for 
goods and services than the federal 
government during 1965, according to 
the May Reader's Digest. Among 
examples of soaring state budgets is 
that of New York, whose current budget 
is larger than Australia's. 




Congressman Conyers of Michigan, following his address at the All-College Assembly sponsored by 
the College Chapter, NAACP, at Savannah Stats College. Left to right: Walter Leonard, Atlanta, 
Georgia Realtor; E. J. Josey, College Librarian and Chapter Advisor; Congressman John Conyers; W. W. 
Law, Georgia NAACP President; Mrs. Mercedes Wright, State Co-Youth Advisor; and James Sapp, Chapter 
President. 




Savannah State to Initiate a Pre-Trial 
Enrollment Program in Summer Session 

President Howard Jordan, Jr., has 
announced that Savannah State College 
will initiate a pre-trial enrollment pro- 
gram during the 1965 summer session. 
The program will be designed to make 
it possible for graduates of accredited 
Georgia high schools who have been 
rejected on original applications to 
State Colleges to improve academic 
deficiencies on which their rejections 
were based. Such pre-trial programs 
have been approved by the Board of 
Regents of the University System of 
Georgia and are in effect in several 
other units of the System at this time. 

The purpose of such programs is to 
enable all graduates of accredited Geor- 
gia high schools who wish to attend col- 
lege to have a second chance to find a 
place in the freshman class of some unit 
of the University System. 

Enrollees in the program will be 
given supplemental instruction in courses 
basic to freshman year college require- 
ments. They will be tested at the end of 
the summer period to determine the 
level of their pre-college achievement. 
Those who show minimum required 
achievement will be granted probation- 
ary admission with the Fall Quarter 
freshman class. 

All persons who were rejected for 
first-time enrollment by Savannah State 
College, and especially those who were 
rejected for the Fall, 1964, and those 
who have been rejected for the Fall 
Quarter, 1965, are invited to enroll in 
this program. In addition, high schools 
are urged to recommend enrollment in 
this program to all prospective June 
graduates who wish to attend college, 
but whose high school achievement 
records may not, at graduation, win 
admission to units of the University 
System. 

Since course offerings under this pro- 
gram will be determined by enrollment, 
prompt application is essential. All ap- 
plications must be received in time to 
schedule courses for the opening session 
of the Summer Quarter which begins 
June 14, 1965. 

Interested persons should contact the 
Director of Admissions, Savannah State 
College, State College Branch, Savan- 
nah, Georgia. 



Charles H. Lee, II is System Programmer and 
Life Service Informater Programmer for General 
Electric Missile and Space Craft Division, Washing- 
ton, D. C. He is a Biology major, class of '65 
and a Chemistry minor. 



Choral Society Appears 
In Numerous Concerts 

The Savannah State College Choral 
Society appeared in concert in Wash- 
ington, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, 
during the month of March. 

On Friday, March 19, the group 
appeared at the Vermont Avenue Baptist 
Church in Washington, D. C. 

On Saturday, March 20, the group 
appeared at the District of Columbia 
Children's Center School in Laurel, 
Maryland. 

On Sunday, March 21, the group ap- 
peared at the Emanuel Institutional 
Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

A 12" Long-Playing, High Fidelity 
Album entitled, SACRED SONGS AND 
SPIRITUALS by the Savannah State 
College Choral Society was released re- 
cently, and is now available in the Col- 
lege Bookstore, or the Department of 
Fine Arts at Savannah State College. 



Columbus G. Brinkley: Assistant pro- 
fessor of electronics technology at Ala- 
bama A. & M. College, received an 
honorary Doctor of Science degree from 
the Midwestern University of Missouri 
recently. Dr. Brinkley is a graduate of 
Savannah State College and Lincoln 
Engineering School, Lincoln, Nebraska. 



Dr. Charles Pratt Presents 
Research Paper at Society 

Dr. Charles Pratt, professor and head 
of the Department of Chemistry, Savan- 
nah State College, represented the Col- 
lege at the National Meeting of the 
American Oil Chemists' Society in 
Houston, Texas, April 25-28, 1965. Dr. 
Pratt presented a research paper on his 
work with cottonseed protein. 

The project was concerned with the 
determination of the sequence of amino 
acids in the protein. It was undertaken 
with the idea that once the true struc- 
ture is known, the protein may be de- 
graded to polypeptide which have im- 
munological properties similar to those 
of the polypeptide insulin. This structure 
determination is undertaken by a modi- 
fication of a procedure first used in 
1950 by the English Scientist, Pehr 
Edman. 

In addition to Dr. Pratt's report at 
the Houston Meeting, two seniors, Miss 
Ernestine Dennis and Miss Ellen Polite 
presented research papers at the Eastern 
Colleges Science Conference in Danbury, 
Connecticut, April 29-30, 1965. Miss 
Dennis' paper was concerned with one 
phase of the protein analysis while Miss 
Polite's discussed her work on the "Syn- 
thetic Preparation of Apiose." 

Miss Dennis is a National Science 
Foundation Undergraduate Research 
Participant in a program which Dr. 
Pratt has directed at Savannah State 
College for the past three years. Re- 
search in the Department of Chemistry 
has been sponsored by grants from the 
National Cottonseed Products Associa- 
tion; The Society of the Sigma Xi; the 
Research Corporation; and The National 
Science Foundation. 



Samuel M. Truell Principal 
Of Sapelo High School 

Samuel M. Truell, a 1963 graduate of 
Savannah State College, has been named 
the principal of the Sapelo High School 
on Sapelo Island, which is a part of the 
Darien school system. 

Mr. Truell is a member of Alpha Phi 
Alpha Fraternity and is a communicant 
of the Butler Presbyterian Church. He 
was formerly associated with the Mid- 
Town Chamber of Commerce; H. Pride 
& Company, and the Atlanta Life Insur- 
ance Company. 



Nearly 29,000 books are published 
each year in the United States, says 
Reader's Digest. 



Men's Glee Club Appears at New York 
World's Fair by Special Invitation 



At the invitation of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Commerce, United States Com- 
mission, the Savannah State College's 
Men's Glee Club appeared at the New 
York World's Fair on May 10-11, 1965. 

The select group of 30 voices, under 
the direction of James Thompson, Jr., 
Instructor in the Dept. of Fine Arts, 
was composed of students from twelve 
academic divisions for whom music is 
an avocation. 

The group's repertory included im- 
portant works of the Pre-Bach A-Capella 
Masters, the Baroque and subsequent 
periods. Their works of Contemporary 
and early composers are always balanced 
with classical choral works and music 
of American traditionally folk music 
and spirituals. The Glee Club has per- 
formed excerpts from such great 
works as Vivaldi's "Gloria," Mozart's 
"Requiem," Bach's "Magnificat," and 
Randall Thompson's "Testament of 
Freedom." 

The Glee Club's traveling itinerary 
has been extensive. They have appeared 
in numerous engagements within the 
State of Georgia and in the eastern part 
of the country. They have visited such 
places as Virginia, Washington, D. C, 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New 
York City. Their recent Spring Tour 
took them to Columbus, Ohio, Detroit, 
Michigan, Chicago, Illinois; Gary and 
Indianapolis, Indiana. They were recent 
guests of the Georgia Teachers and Edu- 
cation Association in Atlanta, Georgia, 
in concert on the association's Cultural 
Night. 

The Glee Club made the following 
appearances in the New York area: 
May 9th, a benefit concert at Mount 
Morris Presbyterian Church, sponsored 
by the New Chapter of the Savannah 
State College Alumni Association; May 
10th, NBC Studios, Radio City, where 
they taped a program for the "Great 
Choirs of America" program, then to 
the RCA Pavilion at the World's Fair. 
May 11th, the group presented a concert 
at the United States Pavilion. 

The organization is dedicated to the 
belief that principles of good choral 
singing is synonymous with Democratic 
ideas. Its motivating force is the belief 
that good choral music, well sung, is a 
potent force for human understanding 
among the peoples of the world. 



'Teachers of the Year' 

Mrs. Martha L. Edwards has been 
named "Teacher of the Year" for 
Laurens County. 




A native of Darien, Georgia, and a 
graduate of Lucy 
Laney High School, 
Augusta, Georgia, 
she received the B.S. 
degree in Social 
Science from Savan- 
nah State College. 
She has done fur- 
ther study at Fort 
Valley State College 
and Atlanta Uni- 
versity. 

Mrs. Edwards is married to Rev. 
Bridges Edwards, Sr., and is the mother 
of a son, Master Bridges Edwards, Jr. 



Mrs. Agnes Mydell has been selected 
"Teacher of the Year" at Effingham 
County Training School. 

Mrs. Mydell received the B.S. degree 
in elementary education from Savan- 
nah State College. She has further en- 
riched her educational background by 
attending workshops and summer 
sessions at Savannah State College. 



Mrs. Louise M. Turner is "Teacher of 
the Year" at Sarah Mills Hodge School, 
Savannah, Georgia. 

A native of Valdosta, Georgia, she 
received the B.S. degree in elementary 
education from Savannah State College 
and has attended workshops of the local 
system and Savannah State College. 

Mrs. Turner is the wife of Coach 
Joseph Turner and the mother of three 
children. 



Mrs. Pauline E. Hagins has been 
chosen "Teacher of the Year" at Martin 
G. Haynes School, Savannah, Georgia. 

She is a native of Savannah, Georgia, 
and a product of the Savannah schools. 
She received the B.C. degree in ele- 
mentary education from Savannah State 
College, and has done further study at 
Atlanta University. She is a Certified 
Supervising Teacher for the State of 
Georgia. 

Mrs. Hagins is married to William 
A. Hagins, and is the sister of L. D. 



Perry. 



Mrs. Dorothy J. Harris, a Special 
Education Teacher at Magnolia High 
School, Thomasville, Georgia, has been 
selected "Teacher of the Year" for 
Region IX. Mrs. Harris is a 1948 gradu- 
ate of Savannah State College. 




Miss Ruth Walling, Associate University Librarian of Emory University, received Distinguished Service 
Award from Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., president at Savannah State College. 



Graduate Named to 
Olympic Coaching Staff 

Ezekiel McDaniel, head track coach 
and coach of the girls' basketball team 
at the Georgia School for the Deaf, was 
selected to serve as a member of the 
coaching staff for the United States Deaf 
Team at the Tenth International Games 
for the Deaf. This event will take place 
at Gallaudet College, Washington, D. C., 
between June 27 and July 2, 1965. 

These games are often referred to as 
the '"Deaf Olympic." The Georgia 
School for the Deaf has placed more 
participants on the squad than any 
other school in the southeast. 

McDaniel is a native of Calhoun, 
Georgia, and a former student and 
teacher at Stephens High School of that 
city. He is also a graduate of Savannah 
State College. He is married to the 
former Mildred Hughes, and the father 
of three children. They reside in Rome, 
Georgia. 



Concert Band directed by Samuel Gill, Savannah State College 

Alumnus 



Mrs. Frankie Golden Ellis, a graduate 
of Savannah State College, will receive 
the Doctor of Edu- 
cation degree in 
Curriculum and In- 
struction at the Uni- 
versity of Texas on 
May 29. The title of 
her thesis is, THE 
SOUTHERN EDU- 
CATION FOUNDA- 
TION AND ITS 
ROLE IN THE IM- 
PROVEMENT OF 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PERSON- 
NEL IN THE SOUTH. Mrs. Ellis 
studied under a Southern Education 
Foundation fellowship while completing 
this degree program at the university. 




Foes of the Fidel Castro regime fill 
at least 48 Cuban prisons, detention 
centers and concentration camps, ac- 
cording to an article in May Reader's 
Digest. Written by a former prisoner 
who spent four years in Castro's prisons, 
the report charges that at least 60,000 
Cubans are still imprisoned because of 
their opposition to the Communist gov- 
ernment of Fidel Castro. 



Wood products account for one of 
America's rapidly growing industries, 
May Reader's Digest reports. Accord- 
ing to recent estimates forest industries 
produce about $25 billion worth of 
goods per year and directly employ 
more than 1,500,000 workers. 

8 







%*- 




Applications Wanted 

Applications are being accepted for 
positions of Vector Control Specialist 
according to an announcement by the 
U. S. Public Health Service's Com- 
municable Disease Center. These po- 
sitions are located in the states of Ala- 
bama. Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, 
Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, 
South Carolina, Texas, Tennessee, 
Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. 
Salaries range from $6050 to $18,580 
per annum. Applications must be re- 
ceived or postmarked on or before June 
1, 1965. 

Full information and application 
forms may be obtained from the Execu- 
tive Secretary, Board of U. S. Civil 
Service Examiners, Communicable Dis- 
ease Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30333; 
Director, Atlanta Region, U. S. Civil 
Service Commission, 240 Peachtree 
Street, N.W., Atlanta, Georgia 30303; 
or apply at any Post Office for these 
forms or information as to where they 
may be obtained. 

Applications may be obtained from 
Examiner-in-Charge, Board of U. S. 
Civil Service Examiners, Room No. 109, 
Main Post Office Building, Savannah, 
Georgia. 



Enterprise Week 

Savannah State College cooperated 
with the Georgia State Chamber of 
Commerce in celebrating Georgia Free 
Enterprise Week, May 2-8, 1965. As a 
part of the celebration, a symposium 
was held at 6:30 p.m., on Friday, May 
7. in the A. V. Center of the Library. 
The principal speaker at this symposium 
was Dr. Sarvan K. Bhatia, Professor of 
Economics at Savannah State College. 
His talk was entitled, "Free Enterprise, 
Why Is It Important To Us." C. W. 
Nysewander, Manager of American Oil 
Company, Savannah, Georgia, spoke 
from his personal experiences about the 
importance of free enterprise to Ameri- 
can industry. The Savannah Area 
Chamber of Commerce cooperated with 
the college in making available necessary 
economic data and slides for presenta- 
tion at the symposium. 

Dr. Sarvan K. Bhatia received his 
Ph.D. degree from Ohio State Univer- 
sity. His doctoral dissertation was, THE 
INTERNATIONAL LABOR ORGAN- 
IZATION AND THE DEVELOPING 
NATIONS. 



Judge Raymond Pace 
Commencement Speak 

The Honorable Raymond Pace Alex- 
ander, Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, will 
be the speaker for Commencement 
Exercises at Savannah State College on 
Sunday, June 6. The Commencement 
Exercises will be held in Willcox Gym- 
nasium, on the campus, at 3 p.m. 



Judge Alexander is a native of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, and a graduate 
of Central High School. He won a 
scholarship to the University of Penn- 
sylvania, and completed the four-year 
course in three years, graduating with 
the highest honors. He is a graduate 
of the Harvard Law School. 

He has appeared frequently as an 
active trial and appellate lawyer in all 
of the trial and appellate courts, state 
and federal in the Philadelphia area and 
states in the north, south, and east. For 
more than 20 years he has served as 
counsel for the Philadelphia and Penn- 
sylvania NAACP in most of its civil 
rights litigation in this area. He is a 
former counsel to the National Medical 
Association; associate counsel to Com- 
mittee on Civil Rights of the Penn- 
sylvania Fellowship Commission; coun- 
sel for American Civil Liberties Union; 
chief counsel for the NAACP in the 
celebrated TRENTON SIX CASE. 

In the summer of 1950, he was sent 
to Germany at the invitation of the 
Commander and officers of Negro 
soldiers in Europe to study the problem 
of Integration of Negro Soldiers in the 
U. S. Army. He made a report to the 
Secretary of Defense, General Marshall, 
entitled, "The Need for Immediate Inte- 
gration of the Negro Soldiers in all 
Branches of the Army." This report was 
widely commended and used as a basis 
for the plan of integration of Negro 
Soldiers in the Army of the United 
States; acted as counsel in action to 
integrate Girard College, appealed twice 
to U. S. Supreme Court; acted as coun- 
sel in many landmark decisions in the 
field of civil liberties and civil rights 
in State and Federal Constitutional Law. 

Numerous honors have been bestowed 
upon Judge Alexander. Some of these 
honors are: honorary degrees of L.L.D. 
and Litt.D. from four universities and 
colleges; counsellor to Haitian Embassy 
in Washington; honorary Consul of 
the Republic of Haiti in Philadelphia; 
member of the Bar of the Republic of 
Haiti (honorary) ; awarded Plaque of 



Alexander to Be 
er for June Class 

Honor and Citation for "Distinguished 
Service in the Struggle to Attain Full 
Equality for All People," by the Ameri- 
can Jewish Congress. Other awards for 
outstanding services were received from 
the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., 
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., The 
Pyramid Club, Inc., The Cotillion So- 
ciety, Inc., The African Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and The Baptist 
Ministers Conference. 

Judge Alexander is a life member of 
Zion Baptist Church of Philadelphia, 
and Chairman of its Board of Trustees 
for ten years. He is a member of Alpha 
Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., and Sigma 
Pi Phi Fraternity (honorary) ; an honor- 
ary member of Lambda Sigma Kappa 
Law Fraternity; a member of the Phila- 
delphia Bar, the Pennsylvania Bar and 
the American Bar Association. 

Some of his legal writings are: "The 
History & Progress of Negro Lawyers 
in America"; "Upgrading of American 
Negro by Supreme Court Decisions"; 
"Administrative Law: A Theat to our 
Constitutional Liberties"; "Racial Dis- 
crimination on Interstate Carriers"; 
and "Progress in Race Relations." He 
has also written many manuscripts and 
dissertations on legal, social, political 
and historical matters. 

He is married to Dr. Sadie T. M. 
Alexander, a graduate of the University 
of Pennsylvania ( B.S., M.A., Ph.D., 
L.L.B. ) . an active practicing Philadel- 
phia attorney, and presently Chairman 
of the Philadelphia Commission on 
Human Relations. They have two daugh- 
ters. 



Airmail Lawrence F. Wilson, son of 
Mrs. Mary L. Wilson of 403 W. 56th 
St., Savannah, Ga., has completed Air 
Force basic military training at Lack- 
land AFB, Texas. 

Airman Wilson is being assigned to 
an Air Force Systems Command unit 
at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, for 
training and duty as an engineering and 
scientific aide. His unit supports the 
AFSC mission systems. 

The airman, a graduate of Boggs 
Academy, Keysville, Ga., received his 
B.S. degree from Savannah State Col- 
lege, Savannah, Georgia. 





Miss Annie R. Roebucke, a 1952 graduate of 
Savannah State College, major, Elementary Edu- 
cation. She is employed by the McDuffie County 
Board of Education as Jeanes Curriculum Director 
of McDuffie County. She serves as president of 
the McDuffie-Warren Chapter of the Savannah 
State College Alumni Association, past president 
of local G.T.E.A. chapter, and chairman of the 
Resolutions Committee of G.T.E.A. Region V. 



Clyde E. Jenkins, son of Mrs. Willie M. 
Jenkins of 320 Marietta St.. Cedartown, 
Ga., has been commissioned as second 
lieutenant in the 
U. S. Air Force up- 
on graduation from 
Officer Training 
School ( OTS ) at 
Lackland AFB, 
Texas. 

Lieutenant Jenk- 
ins, selected for 
OTS through com- 
petitive examina- 
tion, is being as- 
signed to an Air Training Command 
(ATC) unit at Chanute AFB, 111., for 
training as an aircraft maintenance of- 
ficer. His new unit supports the ATC 
mission of training airmen and officers 
in the diverse skills required by the 
nation's aerospace force. 

The Cedar Hill High School graduate 
received his B.S. degree from Savannah 
State College. He is a member of Alpha 
Phi Alpha Fraternity. 




Mrs. Lore:ie M. Johnson, a 1954 gradu- 
ate of Savannah State College, received 
the Master of Education Degree from 
Florida A. & M. University, Saturday, 
April 17, 1965. 




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Another Women's Dormitory under 
construction. 




Addition to Wiley Gym underway. 



\ Jordan Honored as Guest Speaker at Fort 
Valley and Fayetteville Teachers College 



Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., president of 
Savannah State College, was the Honors 
and Awards Day speaker at Fort Valley 
State College, Fort Valley, Georgia, on 
Friday, April 23, 1965. On Wednesday, 
May 12, 1965, Dr. Jordan delivered 
an address at Fayetteville Teachers Col- 
lege, Fayetteville, North Carolina. 

Dr. Jordan was appointed president 
of Savannah State College by the Board 
of Regents of the University System of 
Georgia on September 11, 1963. He 
moved his family to Savannah and took 
office officially on November 1, 1963. 

A native of Beaufort, South Carolina, 
he is married to the former Ruth 
Menafee of Voorhees Junior College, 
Denmark, South Carolina. They have 
one daughter, Judith Louise, a freshman 
at Fisk University. 

Dr. Jordan attended the public schools 
of Beaufort, South Carolina, where he 
graduated from Robert Smalls High 
School. He did his college work at Geor- 
gia State College (now Savannah Stale 
College) and South Carolina State Col- 
lege, receiving the A.B. degree from the 
latter with a major in education and a 
minor in biology. His graduate work for 
the master's degree was done at Howard 
University, Washington, D. C. He re- 
ceived the ED.D. degree in the field of 
Educational Psychology from New York 
University. 

As Chairman of the Department of 
Education; Dean of the School of Edu- 
cation; and Dean of the Faculty at 
South Carolina State College, Dr. 
Jordan worked with the State Depart- 
ment of Education in promoting pro- 
grams of teacher education and certifi- 
cation in the State of South Carolina. 
He is well-known to teacher groups 
throughout the State of South Carolina, 
Georgia, and the Southeast, having 
served as consultant for county educa- 
tion associations, commencement 
speaker, organizer of high school test- 
ing programs, and consultant for various 
professional organizations. In addition, 
he engages in many civic activities. 

In religious activities, he is an Episco- 
palian. Among the professional organ- 
izations in which Dr. Jordan holds 
membership are the following: Phi Delta 
Kappa Honor Society, American Psycho- 
logical Association, Department of Edu- 
cation, N.E.A., American Council on 
Education, National Society for the 
Study of Education, Alpha Kappa Mu 

12 



Honor Society, Department of Audio- 
Visual Education, N.E.A., and American 
Teachers Association. 



Commencement Events — 1965 

9 p.m., Friday, May 21, Junior-Senior 
Prom. Hotel DeSoto. 

6 p.m., Sunday, May 23, Senior 
Vespers. Meldrim Auditorium. 

10:20 a.m., Friday, May 28, Senior 
Class Day Exercises. Willcox Gym- 
nasium. 

7:30-10 p.m., Thursday, June 3, Presi- 
dent's Reception for Seniors, President's 
Residence. 

Saturday, June 5, 10 a.m., Senior 
Brunch. Adams Hall. 5 p.m., National 
Alumni Meeting. Meldrim Auditorium. 
8 p.m., National Alumni Banquet. 
Adams Hall, Curtis V. Cooper, Class 
'55, Biological Technician, U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture, Savannah, 
Georgia, Speaker. 

3 p.m., Sunday, June 6, Commence- 
ment Exercises. Willcox Gymnasium. 
Address: The Honorable Raymond Pace 
Alexander, Judge, The Court of Com- 
mon Pleas, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

5 p.m., Sunday, June 6, President's 
Reception for Graduates, Parents, 
Alumni, Visitors, and Faculty. Presi- 
dent's Residence. 



Charm Week 

Today's Woman: "A Many Faceted 
Challenge," was the theme for the 
Nineteenth Annual Charm Week observ- 
ance at Savannah State College on May 
9-14, 1965. The program was under the 
advisorship of Miss Loreese E. Davis, 
Dean of Women, with Miss Alice 
Murray serving as Chairman, Miss 
Vivian McMillan, Co-Chairman, Miss 
Lois Carson, Secretary, and Miss Betty 
Small, Assistant Secretary. 

At 6 p.m., Sunday, May 9, Vespers 
were held in Meldrim Auditorium with 
Mrs. Yvonne Hooks Mathis, a graduate 
of Savannah State College, the speaker. 
Immediately following Vespers the 
dormitories were opened and refresh- 
ments were served. 

The campus sororities conducted 
seminars Monday through Thursday on 
the changes and trends in education, 
morals, religion and social needs. 

The Mantle Passing Ceremony honor- 
ing the highest ranking junior woman 
was conducted at the All-College As- 
sembly on Friday, May 14, at 10:20 
a.m., in Willcox Gymnasium. Miss Irene 
Elmore, "Miss Savannah State" was 
the speaker. 

The week closed with the Annual 
Fashion and Talent Show in Meldrim 
Auditorium at 8 p.m. May 14. 




Fund Raising Committee of Savannah Chapter of National Alumni Association, left to right: Leonard 
Law, Benjamin Lewis, Prince Mitchell, Nathaniel Thomas, Norman Elmore, Daniel Washington, Clarence 
Lofton, Arthur Fluellen. Seated: Miss Doris Riggs, Mrs. Rosemary Banks, and Mrs. Margaret Washington. 




Opportunities Offered in the Division of the 
Natural Sciences and Mathematics, at SSC 



DEAN NELSON FREEMAN 

Nelson R. Freeman Receives 
Alumni Leadership Award 

According to Frank Robinson, Princi- 
pal of Wayne County Training School, 
Jesup, Georgia, Nelson R. Freeman, Di- 
rector of Student Personnel Services and 
Dean of Men at Savannah State College, 
was awarded the W.C.T.S. Alumni 
Leadership Award on May 5, 1965. The 
award was presented on behalf of the 
faculty and students of the school to 
Mr. Freeman "in gracious appreciation 
for keen interest in the students of 
Wayne County, profound influence, and 
admirable qualities that help shape the 
destiny of our State, Nation, and the 
world. 

Mr. Freeman is a graduate of Savan- 
nah State College. 



Washington Chapter News 

The following officers were elected 
at the Annual Meeting of the Washing- 
ton Chapter on January 23, 1965. These 
officers were installed at the Seventh 
Annual Banquet on February 27, 1965. 
The banquet was held at the Presidential 
Arms, 1320 G. Street, N.W., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

James 0. Thomas, Jr., President; 
Julius Smith, Vice President; Mrs. 
Hattie N. Brown, Recording Secretary; 
Mrs. Juanite C. Wells, Corresponding 
Secretary; Mrs. Zelma Gordan, Fi- 
nancial Secretary; Mrs. Mary A. Lee, 
Treasurer; Dr. Julius H. Gooden, 
Custodian, and Rev. Robert M. Pugh, 
Public Relations. 

Board of Directors: Harold Burns 
and Mrs. Ora M. Washington. 

The speaker for the banquet was the 
Rev. Walter Fountroy, Pastor of New 
Bethel Baptist Church of Washington, 
D. C. 



The Division of Science and Mathe- 
matics, of Savannah State College, is 
proud of the record that it has made in 
helping young people find themselves 
in the scientific and mathematical world 
during the last quarter of a century. 

Recent high school graduates, con- 
fused in this complex world and other 
graduates of high schools, who were 
unable to "cross that bridge" from sec- 
ondary school to college, finally made 
their way into this Division through the 
effort of the Public Relations Depart- 
ment of Savannah State College, and 
received priceless information and guid- 
ance from well-trained and experienced 
personnel in the areas of biology, chem- 
istry, mathematics, and physics. These 
people have satisfied the requirements 
of this Institution of learning for the 
baccalaureate degrees, which the Col- 
lege conferred upon them with great 
enthusiasm and with that confidence 
that they were well prepared to take 
their places in this great world of 
Science and Mathematics. 

Today, the Division of Sciences and 
Mathematics is ready to help you get 
started in life. This is a changing world, 
and these changes are occurring at a 
rapid rate, YOU NEED OUR HELP to 
keep pace with these rapid changes. 
We are prepared to do the type of jobs 
as needed in this day. 

The aims of the Department of 
Biology are: (1) to provide for all stu- 
dents that knowledge which is essential 
to an understanding of the biological 
basis of living; (2) to train persons 
adequately through the media of ad- 
vanced courses for entry into the pro- 
fessional study of dentistry, medicine, 
and nursing; (3) to prepare persons io 
teach the biological sciences in the sec- 
ondary school or to continue study on 
the graduate level. 

In addition to the required general 
courses, this department offers courses 
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of 
Science with a major in biology. This 
department offers also a minor. 

The Biology Department is proud of 
its achievements during the last several 
years. It takes great pride in reviewing 
the records of some of its graduates 
such as the ones listed below: 

Julius H. Gooden, Ph.D., College Pro- 
fessor. 

Alfonso Orr, Ph.D., Research 
Biologist. 



Henry Collier, M.D., Successful Prac- 
titioner. 

James Densler, M.D., graduated with 
highest honors from medical school. 

Darnell Jackson, D.D.S., Private 
Practice. 

Frank Baldwin, D.D.S. (on dental 
faculty), Private Practice. 

Margaret Chisolm Robinson, M.S., 
outstanding college instructor. 

Charles Johnson, M.S., Science teacher 
on secondary level (doing excellent 
work ) . 

Mercedes Mitchell (deceased), Re- 
search Medical Technologist, United 
States Public Health. 

Oscar Mitchell, Research Medical 
Technologist, United States Public 
Health. 

Sarah Mclver, Medical Technologist. 

Emory Campbell, Research Assistant 
in Medicine. 

Curtis Cooper, Research Technologist. 

Julius Stevens, Science teacher. 

Edith S. Chisholm, Research Tech- 
nologist. 

Ada C. Coxon, Medical Technologist. 

James Johnson, Research Public 
Health. 

Hugh Bryant, Histologist. 

Inez Bacon, Medical Technologist. 

Arthur Scott, Research in Cancer. 

Joseph Lang, Research Worker. 

Elbert Hicks, Research Assistant. 

Marvin Green, Research Assistant. 

Thomas Turner, U. S. Air Force 
Captain. 



Did King Arthur actually exist? If 
so, did he truly preside over the 
legendary knights of the round table? 
According to a May Reader's Digest 
article, evidence suggests that there was 
a real King Arthur, a powerful Celtic 
chieftain who led his countrymen against 
the invading Saxons in the fifth century. 
But excavations carried on in the 1930's 
failed to turn up evidence that Arthur 
had any real connection with Tintagel, 
his lengendary home. 



The state of California's projected 
1965-66 Budget exceeds the total amount 
of money spent by all 48 states in 1938, 
notes Reader's Digest. 



13 



Press Institute Covered 
Four Major Areas 

"Problems of the College Newspaper 
and Its Production" was the theme of a 
three hour long discussion by seven 
college newspaper representatives under 
the direction of Paul Mohr, publications' 
advisor at Gibbs Junior College, St. 
Petersburg, Florida. 

Topics of interest included the type 
of print used by college papers; the em- 
ployment of staff members; the im- 
portance of deadlines; the content of 
news; the editorial policy; the endors- 
ing of school officers; and the im- 
portance of a guideline. 

While it remains true that the trend 
among college newspapers today is to 
use offset, it was pointed out that in- 
dividuals differ in their printing tech- 
niques, and that the frequency of the 
publication would cause papers to use 
because it is easier to handle. 

After several comments from the stu- 
dent representative and faculty con- 
sultants, Director Mohr suggested that 
possible news content include a variety 
of news, a literary section, world topics, 
student topics of interest, and feature 
alumni as a start. 

Editorial policy, as defined by the 
college newspaper group discussion is a 
"mature responsibility" given to the 
editor of the paper, or to an editorial 
board. This policy should make all at- 
tempts to be unquestionably objective. 
James T. Sheppard, staff writer, Sa- 
vannah Morning News, indicated that 
"a decision should be made as to who 
will determine the editorial policy." 

Discussion group members included 
Paul B. Mohr, public relations director, 
Gibbs Junior College; James T. Shep- 
pard, staff writer, Savannah Morning 
News; Dr. H. I. Fontellio-Nanton, Ad- 
ministrative Dean, Allen University; and 
Thelma Roundtree, advisor to the Stu- 
dent Newspaper, St. Augustine's College. 

Student representatives were Seymore 
Sailer, Gibbs Junior College; Calvin 
Harris, Gibbs; Leonard Hines, Albany 
State; Richard Walker, Tuskegee In- 
stitute; Frida Williamson, Spellman; 
Carolyn Roland, Gibbs; and Elizabeth 
Simpkins, Savannah State. 

High School Press 

Workshops sometimes tend to be 
similar as high school and college dele- 
gates will attest when they pause to 
review the day's events. 



While each session had its highlight 
— be it the searching questions of the 
audience, the phrasing of the speaker, 
or the many pages of scribbled notes — 
the printed and offset high school news- 
paper workshop offered its numbers the 
following capsule comments by Prof. 
Louis J. Corsetti of Duquesne Univer- 
sity. 

"We are all ignorant, but only in 
different things. As journalists we have 
to be less ignorant than anyone else 
and this is why the well-rounded, broad 
base of experience in many areas is 
beneficial. 

"Punctuality, responsibility and de- 
pendability are all 'musts' in the field 
of journalism. 

"There are no dress rehearsals in our 
field, it has to be right the first time. 

"Communication is a two-way street; 
it depends upon the speaker and the 
listener for its very existence. This 
existence can die by the lack of under- 
standing and/or interest on the part of 
either party." 

Prof. Corsetti reminded the students 
that journalism is a field which demands 
that its members think continuously. 
"Such strenuous mental activity is 
bound to keep you on your toes," he 
said. 



Elementary Press 

Electrical enthusiasm, both mechani- 
cally and journalistically, were charac- 
teristic of the atmosphere of the morn- 
ing class in "Duplicated Newspapers, 
Elementary and Junior High Press" as 
students witnessed typewriter demon- 
strations by IBM Sales Representative 
Kenny Williams on the Executive Elec- 
tric and Selectric. 

Such machines are now in great de- 
mand due to the shortage of linotype 
operators, and the high price of using 
hot-type, rather than offset type," Wil- 
liams said. 

Representatives of St. Jude Catholic 
School, Sumter, S. C, acted as student 
demonstrators. Sister John Berchman 
is the school's journalism teacher. 

Other high school representatives in- 
cluded Oconee High School, Dublin, 
Georgia; Turner High School, Atlanta, 
Georgia; Southside High School, Col- 
bert, Georgia; Spencer High School, 
Columbus, Georgia; and Carver High 
School, Douglas, Georgia. 




Mrs. Lula Dixon Andrews is employed by the 
Department of Defense as an assistant supervisor 
of the Training Output Section. She attended 
Savannah State College in 1939 and 1940. She 
is a member of the Washington Chapter of the 
National Alumni Association. 



Yearbook Sessions 

Discussion of layout procedures high- 
lighted the seminar on yearbooks Thurs- 
day held in the Audio-Visual Center. 
Institute advisors presented information 
on page formats and tips on developing 
work schedules. 

Organization and management of 
yearbook development was emphasized 
as the key to a successful publication. 
Trends in panels of photographs for 
class pictures drew lively discussion 
from the delegates, many of whom have 
the responsibility for the yearbooks in 
their own schools or who will be 
responsible for the publication next 
year. 

The importance of advertising and 
methods of selling advertisers was out- 
lined as well as several techniques for 
placement of the advertisements within 
the publication. 



History repeated itself with uncanny 
accuracy when a dam burst near 
Longarone, Italy in 1964, wiping out 
that small town and several nearby 
hamlets. The May Reader's Digest notes 
that in history's only comparable dis- 
aster, the tragic Johnstown, Pa. flood 
of 1389, 2200 lives were lost. The 
Longarone catastrophe took a known 
toll of 1917 lives, but authorities be- 
lieve that from 200 to 300 additional 
lives were lost, making the total almost 
identical to that of the Johnstown flood. 



14 



Activist to Head Student 
Bar Association at 
Howard Law School 

At the Ninth Annual Barrister's Ball 
of the Howard Law Student Bar Associa- 
tion, officers elected to lead the Student 
Bar Association for 1965-66 were an- 
nounced. At half-time of the gala affair, 
held at the International Inn, Washing- 
ton, D. C, outgoing SBA president, 
James Alston, announced that Bobby 
L. Hill had been chosen by the student 
body out of six candidates to lead the 
student bar for 1965-66. Hill is a native 
of Athens, Georgia and former National 
Youth Field Secretary — NAACP, with 
an impressive record of civil rights ac- 
tivity, campaigned on a platform of 
"action" for the Howard law student 
body. 

Hill is a graduate of Savannah State 
College where he was very active in the 
civil rights struggle. He was chairman 
of the Student Action Council Commit- 
tee and led the nine day boycott in 1963 
against administrative restrictions 
which caused him to appear on nation- 
wide television and be written about in 
the NEW YORK TIMES and JET. 
His leadership in this movement won 
him the '"1963 Man of the Year Award" 
for Savannah State College. He has also 
served on the YMCA, National Youth 
Council, National Youth Advisory Com- 
mittee, and NAACP. Now, as a con- 
sultant, he writes for the Southern News 
Syndicate which includes THE COLUM- 
BIA NEWS, MACON WEEKLY NEWS 
and THE ALBANY INQUIRER. 

At Howard, along with being SBA 
president, he is a member of the Law 
Student Civil Rights Research Council 
and the Law Journal Staff whose ban- 
quet he recently serves as emcee. 

During the two week campaign, Hill 
criticized the student body for acting 
"contrary to its historical image of being 
actively and directly involved in the 
civil rights struggle," and was critical 
of the administration for what he called 
"closing the channels of communications 
which allow for the articulation of stu- 
dent recommendations and protest." 
Now as president-elect of the SBA, Hill 
vows to sponsor a "courageous and 
comprehensive program to correct the 
shortcomings" of which he is critical. 




S.S.C. P.R. man shows S.S.C. exhibit to Albany State's Alumna at State meeting in Atlanta. 



Miss Claudia Lindsay, Guest 
During Fine Arts Festival 

The 11th Annual Fine Arts Festival 
opened at Savannah State College on 
Sunday, May 2 at 6 p.m., with a con- 
cert by the College Concert Band in 
Meldrim Auditorium. The Band is 
under the direction of Samuel A. Gill. 
According to Dr. Coleridge A. Braith- 
waite, Chairman of the Department of 
Fine Arts, this program and all of the 
other programs held during this week 
are open to the public without charge. 

Immediately following the concert, 
the Second Annual High School Art 
Exhibit opened on the third floor of 
Hill Hall, and remained open through 
Friday, May 21. The exhibit was under 
the direction of Phillip J. Hampton, As- 
sistant Professor of Fine Arts. 

Miss Claudia Lindsey, a noted young 
soprano, presented a song recital in 
Meldrim Auditorium on Wednesday, 
May 5 at 8:15 p.m. Miss Lindsey was 
making her first visit to Savannah. She 
was accompanied by Julius Robinson. 
Recently Miss Lindsey won an award in 
the Metropolitan Opera Auditions. She 
has been attracting rave notices by 
music critics everywhere that she has 
appeared. 

Instrumental and vocal students in 
the Department of Fine Arts presented 
a concert during the All-College As- 



sembly on Thursday, May 6 at 10:20 
a.m. 

The Festival ended on Thursday, May 
6 at 8 p.m., with a piano recital by the 
National Fraternity of Student 
Musicians under the direction of Mrs. 
Alice C. Wright. Students from ele- 
mentary grades through college levels 
participated in this recital in Meldrim 
Auditorium. 

Members of the Department of Fine 
Arts include: Mrs. Myra Thomas, Mrs. 
Farnese Lumpkin, Mrs. Susan Waters, 
Phillip J. Hampton, James Thompson, 
Jr., Samuel A. Gill, and Dr. Coleridge 
A. Braithwaite, Chairman. 



Support 

Your 

Alumni 

Association 



15 



SSC Trade and Industry Conference 
Attracts 500 Students and Instructors 



Over 500 students and instructors at- 
tended the 16th Annual Meeting and 
Contest of the Georgia Youth Industrial 
Education Association which convened 
at Savannah State College March 25th 
and 26th. This association is under the 
supervision of the Georgia State Dept. 
of Education with A. Z. Traylor, Sr., 
state itinerant teacher-trainer serving as 
adviser, with Dr. Clyde W. Hall, direc- 
tor division of Technical Sciences Sa- 
vannah State College serving as co- 
adviser. 

Miss Barbara Collie, student at 
Sophronia Tompkins Senior High 
School, Savannah, was selected as 
"Queen of Industry" for the high school 
division. Miss Mary Huff, student of 
William James High School, Statesboro, 
was first runner-up. Miss Lorea Davis 
was selected "Queen of Industry" for 
the state vocational - technical - trade 
school division. Miss Davis is a student 
at Monroe Area Vocational-Technical 
School, Albany. Miss Ada Gasden was 
the first runner-up. She is a student at 
Harris Area Trade School, Savannah. 

The preceding paragraphs show the 
prize winners in the various contests 
sponsored by the Georgia Youth Indus- 
trial Education Association at Savannah 
State College during the two-day meet- 
ing. 

AUTO BODY AND FENDER: 1st 
Place, James Brown, Monroe Area Voc. 
Tech. School, Albany. 2nd Place, Joseph 
Miller, Harris Area Trade School, Sa- 
vannah. BOOKKEEPING: 1st Place, 
Lucile Coleman, Monroe Area Voc. 
Tech. School, Albany. 2nd Place, Edith 
McArthur, Richmond Area Voc. Tech. 
School, Augusta. CARPENTRY: 1st 
Place, James Langford, Carver Voca- 
tional High School, Atlanta. 2nd Place, 
Albert Lewis and William T. Jones, 
Ballard-Hudson High School, Macon. 

COSMETOLOGY— High School: 1st 
Place, Sylvia Sims, Carver Vocational 
High School, Atlanta. 2nd Place, Jacque- 
line Miller, Ballard-Hudson High School, 
Macon. COSMETOLOGY — Area 
School: 1st Place, Georgia Jenkins, 
Pinevale Area Voc. School, Valdosta. 
2nd Place, Lillie Foster, Monroe Area 
Voc. Tech. School, Albany. ESSAY: 1st 
Place, Mollie Addy, Monroe High 
School, Valdosta. 2nd Place, Jacqueline 
Smith, Ballard-Hudson High School, 
Macon. 



LEATHERCRAFT: 1st Place, Lonnie 
Aker, Main High School, Rome. 2nd 
Place, Jerry Burdette, Main High 
School, Rome. MECHANICAL DRAW- 
ING: 1st Place, William Stanley, Har- 
per High School, Atlanta. 2nd Place, 
Leroy McClellan, Carver High School, 
Douglas. NURSE'S AIDE: 1st Place, 
Helease Williams, Monroe High School, 
Albany. 2nd Place, Sheila Ann Williams, 
Monroe High School, Albany. 

ORATORY: 1st Place, Lucile Travis, 
T. W. Josey High School, Augusta. 2nd 
Place, Isaac Newkirk, Tompkins High 
School, Savannah. POWER ME- 
CHANICS: 1st Place, Don Roberts, 
Washington High School, Blakely. 2nd 
Place, Bradford Hubbard, Washington 
High School, Blakely. RADIO REPAIR 
— High School: 1st Place, Samuel Alex- 
ander, Lucy Laney High School, Au- 
gusta. 2nd Place, Anthony Lovett, Tomp- 
kins High School, Savannah. 

RADIO — Area School: 1st Place, 
Rudolph Morris, Monroe Area Voc. 
Tech. School, Albany. 2nd Place, 
Everette Holmes, Harris Area Trade 
School, Savannah. SHOE REPAIR: 1st 
Place, Dalton Dewberry, Ballard-Hudson 
High School, Macon. 2nd Place, Grady 
Morris, Carver Vocational High School, 
Atlanta. SHORTHAND & TYPING: 1st 
Place, Dorothy Brown, Harris Area 
Trade School, Savannah. 2nd Place, 
Sandra Maner, Harris Area Trade 
School, Savannah. 

TAILORING: 1st Place, Willie Smith, 
Ballard-Hudson High School, Macon. 
2nd Place, Harold Franklin, Carver 
Vocational High School, Atlanta. UP- 
HOLSTERY: 1st Place, Bennie Moon, 
Carver Vocational High School, Atlanta. 
2nd Place, Adams Yarborough, Carver 
Vocational High School, Atlanta. 
WOODWORK - - Industrial Arts: 1st 
Place, Marion Wilson, Tompkins High 
School, Savannah. 2nd Place, Calvin 
Montgomery, Main High School, Rome. 

WOODWORK — High School: 1st 
Place, Charles Banks, Monroe High 
School, Albany. 2nd Place, Alfred Reid, 
Monroe High School, Albany. AUTO 
MECHANICS— High School: 1st Place, 
Thomas Steel and Tommy Ingram, Car- 
ver Vocational High School, Atlanta. 
2nd Place, Paul Pugh and Jack Comb, 
Lucy Laney High School, Augusta. 
AUTO MECHANICS— Area School: 1st 
Place, Wesley Arnold and George 
Brown, Monroe Area Voc. Tech. School, 
Albany. 2nd Place, James Turnan and 



Leonard Blount, Richmond Area Voc. 
Tech. School, Augusta. 

BRICKLAYING — High School: 1st 
Place, George A. Bailey, Carver Voca- 
tional High School, Atlanta. 2nd Place, 
Robert W. Anderson, Lucy Laney High 
School, Augusta. BRICKLAYING — 
Area School: 1st Place, Herman Spann, 
Harris Area Trade School, Savannah. 
2nd Place, Morris Gaines, Monroe Area 
Voc. Tech. School, Albany. BRICKLAY- 
ING — Industrial Arts: 1st Place, James 
C. Williams, Southside Jr. High School, 
Albany. 2nd Place, Charles Mitchell, 
Southside Jr. High School, Albany. 

DRESSMAKING: 1st Place, Minnie 
Shields, Tompkins High School, Savan- 
nah. 2nd Place, Barbara Abrams, Car- 
ver Vocational High School, Atlanta. 
ELECTRICITY — Industrial Arts: 1st 
Place, Curtis Hicks, Ralph Bunche High 
School, Woodbine. 2nd Place, James 
Baker, Ralph Bunche High School, 
Woodbine. ELECTRICITY — Area 
School. 1st Place, Lindberg Jackson, 
Monroe Area Voc. Tech. School, Al- 
bany. 2nd Place, William McMillian, 
Monroe Area Voc. Tech. School, Albany. 

BARBERING: 1st Place, Marion 
Warren, Tompkins High School, Sa- 
vannah. 2nd Place, Henry Wilson, Mon- 
roe High School, Albany. DRY CLEAN- 
ING: 1st Place, Herman Smith, Tomp- 
kins High School, Savannah. 2nd Place, 
Nightingale McKenzie, Tompkins High 
School, Savannah. INDUSTRIAL ARTS 
EXHIBIT. WOODWORK: 1st Place, 
Joseph Montgomery, Main High School, 
Rome. 2nd Place, Charles Banks, Mon- 
roe High School, Albany. MECHANI- 
CAL DRAWING: 1st Place, Walter 
Tolbert, Tompkins High School, Sa- 
vannah. 2nd Place, Leroy McClelland, 
Carver High School, Douglas. 

METALWORK: 1st Place, B. Hub- 
bard, Washington High School, Blakely. 
LEATHERCRAFT: 1st Place, Lonnie 
Aker, Main High School, Rome. 2nd 
Place, Barbara West, Washington High 
School, Blakely. ELECTRONICS: 1st 
Place, Warren Jacob, Ralph Bunche 
High School, Woodbine. 2nd Place, 
Mungin Harvel, Southside Jr. High 
School, Albany. WOOD TURNING: 1st 
Place, Jerry Burdette, Main High 
School, Rome. 2nd Place, Kenneth Dean, 
Main High School, Rome. 



16 



Chance Encounter Led to 
Friendship Movement 

An idea born of a chance encounter 
between an American college student 
and three foreign students has blossomed 
into a friendship program that is help- 
ing to turn many college campuses into 
centers of international understanding. 

Launched just five years ago, the 
People-to-People University Program 
(PPUP) is helping undergraduates win 
the lasting friendship of thousands of 
foreign students who might otherwise 
feel quite differently. 

In a May Reader's Digest article, 
author James Poling notes that the pro- 
gram began when Bill Dawson, an 
American studying at the University of 
Kansas, overheard three foreign stu- 
dents complaining bitterly about the life 
at the university. Dawson broke into 
their conversation, learned that they had 
not been able to make a single American 
friend in a year at the university — 
simply because no one had bothered to 
make their acquaintance. 

Dawson formed a council of student 
leaders to work out ways to solve the 
problem of the foreign students' isola- 
tion from Americans. They organized 
forums for local and foreign students, 
special campus and community tours, 
hospitality programs for students from 
abroad and other programs for ac- 
quainting foreigners with America and 
Americans. 

Word of the project soon spread to 
other colleges, and eventually the Peo- 
ple-to-People organization offered its 
aid. The Kansas plan was incorporated 
into People-to-People, a worldwide 
friendship organization that President 
Eisenhower had started in 1956. 

Today the program has spread to 
117 colleges, and hopes eventually to be 
operating on every campus where there 
is an enrollment of 25 or more foreign 
students. Some 13,000 young Americans 
are involved in its activities. 

The importance of the program can 
be seen when one remembers that the 
anti-American attitude of Ghana's Presi- 
dent Nkrumah has been traced to the 
discrimination he experienced in the 
U. S. during his student days, the article 
notes. With some 75,000 foreigners 
studying here each year, many of them 
destined for leadership roles in their 
own countries, making friends is more 
than just a pleasant pastime. 

The young men and women who 
participate in the People-to-People Uni- 
versity Program are doing their best to 
see to it that the image of America that 
foreign students take home with them 
is one of warmth and friendliness. 



United Student Aid 
Funds Available 

NEW YORK— If you need financial 
assistance for your next term of college, 
the best time to arrange it is right now, 
an authority on student aid advised here 
this week. 

Allen D. Marshall, President of United 
Student Aid Funds, Inc., pointed out 
that college loan officers are usually in 
a position to arrange in the spring for 
loans to be disbursed in the summer or 
fall terms. Qualified students on most 
campuses can borrow either from the 
college itself, from the federal govern- 
ment under the National Defense Edu- 
cation Act, or from commercial banks 
participating in various nonprofit state 
or private guarantee programs. 

USA Funds, the largest such private 
program, has endorsed loans for 41,264 
students in 700 colleges and universities. 
Mr. Marshall reported, its current en- 
dorsement rate exceeds $30 million a 
year. Needy students can borrow up to 
$1,000 annually in their sophomore, 
junior, and senior years, and up to 
$2,000 annually in graduate years. Re- 
payment, at a nonprofit rate of interest, 
does not begin until five months after 
the borrower leaves school, and extends 
over three or more years. 

More than 6,000 banks now make 
loans based on USA Funds guarantees, 
Mr. Marshall said. In most cases the stu- 
dent borrows from his own home bank, 
and so not only acquires a knowledge 
of credit principles but establishes an 
invaluable credit rating for his later 
business life. 

To be eligible for a USA Funds loan, 
a student needs only a statement from 
his college that he is of good character 
and in good academic standing. Loans 
can be arranged in the spring for dis- 
bursement in summer or fall terms. 

Every accredited college is eligible 
to participate in the USA Funds pro- 
gram. A student can learn whether his 
college is a participant simply by asking 
his loan officer. Full information is 
available from United Student Aid 
Funds, Inc., 845 Third Avenue, New 
York, New York 10022. 




The late humorist Robert Benchley 
once secured a bank loan, then with- 
drew his savings account, the May 
Reader's Digest recalls. "I don't trust a 
bank that would lend money to such a 
poor risk," he growled in explanation. 



Dr. Julius H. Gooden, Associate Professor of 
Biology, at Bowie State College, Bowie, Maryland, 
is a 1946 graduate of Savannah State College. 
He received his M.S. degree from the University 
of Minnesota and his Ph.D. degree from Indiana 
State University. 



Coast Guard Invites College 

Seniors to Apply For OCS 

WASHINGTON, D. C. — College 
seniors or graduate students can fulfill 
their military obligation as officers in 
the U. S. Coast Guard, the active peace- 
time Service. Qualified applicants will 
be notified of selection for Officer 
Candidate School before they enlist. 

The classes convene in September and 
February at the Coast Guard Reserve 
Training Center in historic Yorktown. 
Va. 

The carefully selected college gradu- 
ates receive 17 weeks of intensive, highly 
specialized training. Successful ap- 
plicants • are commissioned as ensigns 
and serve on active duty for three years. 

Coast Guard officers receive the same 
pay and benefits as officers of other 
Armed Forces. These include 30 days of 
annual leave as well as free medical and 
dental care. They also have an oppor- 
tunity to qualify for flight training. 

Peacetime duties of the Coast Guard 
include law enforcement, search and 
rescue, oceanographic research, ocean 
station patrols, and the maintenance of 
aids to navigation. 

For further information on the U. S. 
Coast Guard Officer Candidate School, 
write: Commandant (PTP-2), U. S. 
Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, 
D. C. 20226. 



17 



NSA Summer Study Abroad 
Programs Accredited 

Three hours college credit is now 
offered on two summer study abroad 
programs, the U. S. National Student 
Association, 265 Madison Avenue, New 
York, announced recently. 

The Italian Art Seminar, which has 
been accredited by the Boston Univer- 
sity Summer Term, takes students to 
Florence for 46 days, where they live in 
a lovely villa, while studying the de- 
velopment of Romanesque, Gothic and 
Renaissance art in Italy. The program 
includes field trips to many other Tuscan 
art centers, plus a weekend in Venice, 
and a special "Roman holiday." 

The Politics and Economics Study 
Tour, accredited by Colby College, in- 
cludes travel in eight European coun- 
tries, two of them behind the Iron 
Curtain, and emphasizes current na- 
tional developments, the impact of the 
Common Market and the relationship 
of several international organizations 
to European and world interests. 

NSA has more than 20 general tours, 
special interest tours, and study pro- 
grams planned for students this summer. 

One of the most popular general 
tours, The North-South Tour, takes stu- 
dents to England, Scotland, Norway, 
Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Switzer- 
land, Italy, and France. 

The Latin American Affairs Program 
has been designed for the student who 
wants to learn about political, economic, 
and social conditions in South America, 
in addition to seeing all the sights. 

A Bicycling and Hosteling Tour of 
Europe is included for those who are 
sound of wind and limb, and a Festivals 
of Music and Drama Tour for those 
who want to be entertained. 

For over 16 years this non-profit 
organization has provided college-budget 
travel and study programs for American 
students who view travel as an educa- 
tional experience. 

All tours and study programs include 
native student guides in each country, 
student parties, all accommodations, 
three meals daily, evening entertainment, 
transfers, tips and taxes. 

For complete information and a free 
booklet "Exciting Student Tours 
Abroad," write: U. S. National Student 
Association, Dept. BG, 265 Madison 
Avenue, New York, New York 10016. 




Mrs. Birdie Lee P. Reviere is a Plainmeter Typist 
for The Long County Agriculture Stabilization Con- 
servation Service in Ludowici, Georgia. She is a 
graduate of Savannah State College and a mem- 
ber of the Alumni Association. 



A Number of Grants 
Offered By Gov't 

Because of the increasing interest in 
inter-American studies, the United 
States Government is offering a number 
of grants for study in Latin America 
under the Fulbright-Hays program for 
the 1966-67 academic year. The pro- 
gram is supervised by the Board of 
Foreign Scholarships and administered 
by the Institute of International Edu- 
cation (HE). 

The grants are available for Ameri- 
can students with proficiency in the 
spoken language for Argentina, Bolivia, 
Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, 
Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salva- 
dor, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, 
Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, 
Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. Students 
may indicate up to three countries of 
preference in Latin America. 

Applicants for the awards must be 
U. S. citizens with at least a bachelor's 
degree by the beginning date of the 
grant. Preference will be given to ap- 
plicants in the fields of social sciences, 
education, humanities and the arts. The 
fields especially recommended for study 
are Architecture, Anthropology, Eco- 
nomics, Education, Geography, History, 



History of Art, Journalism, Law, 
Language and Literature, Political 
Science, and Sociology. 

The grants provide round-trip trans- 
portation, tuition, books and mainte- 
nance. While married students may ap- 
ply, the awards do not provide for de- 
pendents' travel and support and are 
thus better suited for single persons. 
Grantees will be expected to participate 
in the academic life of the country of 
assignment. They should have a special 
interest in the Latin American area and 
specifically in the country or countries 
for which they apply. 

Application forms and information 
for students currently enrolled in Sa- 
vannah State College may be obtained 
from the campus Fulbright Advisor, J. 
Randolph Fisher. Application pro- 
cedures are described in the brochure, 
"United States Government Grants for 
Graduate Study Abroad, 1966-67," pub- 
lished by HE (809 United Nations 
Plaza, New York, N. Y. 10017). 

The Institute of International Edu- 
cation is the largest nonprofit organiza- 
tion in the field of international ex- 
change. It administers programs in- 
volving the exchange of students, 
scholars, leaders, artists, and pro- 
fessional men and women between the 
United States and more than 100 coun- 
tries and also serves as a clearinghouse 
for information on all aspects of inter- 
national exchange. 



/. Herbert King, Public Relations Direc- 
tor of Crane Evening School, released 
some interesting details to the Chicago 
Defender in a recent report on the 
progress and programs offered at Crane. 
King is a graduate of Savannah State 
College. 

Said King, "The Evening School has 
become a major source in this area. 
The 1960 census showed that the 
medium education of adults in the area 
was less than 8.5 years of formal edu- 
cation." 

Commenting on the 1963-64 program 
offered at Crane, Mr. King revealed that 
fifty-one regular high school classes had 
an enrollment of 878 students; that 
seven regular elementary classes had 
322 students enrolled. In addition, a 
non-credit First Aid class and the 
Americanization class for foreign speak- 
ing adults are among the many class 
courses conducted. 

Mr. King added: "This joint effort 
of the Board of Education and the Wel- 
fare Department is unique in the United 
States as an unusual example of inter- 
governmental agencies proposing to face 
the vexing and grevious problem of in- 
creasing dependency and spiraling wel- 
fare cost. 



18 



Wall Street Journal Newspaper Fund Awards 
Savannah State $2,000 Grant For Workshop 



For the second consecutive summer 
the Wall Street Journal's Newspaper 
Fund has awarded Savannah State Col- 
lege a $2,000 grant to sponsor a Journal- 
ism Workshop for inexperienced pub- 
lications advisors, and journalism in- 
structors in junior colleges, secondary, 
technical and vocational schools. 

Persons receiving awards this year 
are as follows: PARTIAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIPS: Theodore W. Green, Soperton, 
Ga.; Mrs. Evelyn M. Wright, Athens, 
Ga.; Mrs. Anne C. Marks, Freeport, 
L. I., N. Y.; Miss Julia E. Cheely, Craw- 
fordville, Ga.; Mrs. Nettie M. Webb, 
Atlanta, Ga. ; and Miss Cynthia Toney, 
Leesburg, Ga. 

FULL SCHOLARSHIPS: Mrs. Ruth 



S. Purnell, Hamilton, Ga.; Mrs. Lillian 
C. Jackson, Huntsville, Ala.; Mrs. Addie 
S. Moreland, Pelham, Ga.; Theoaster C. 
Morgan, Normal, Ala.; Mrs. Richie T. 
Adams, Quitman, Ga.; Mrs. Pearline A. 
Davis, Atlanta, Ga.; Mrs. Bertha R. 
Scruggs, Huntsville, Ala.; Miss Alice E. 
Moore, Rock Hill, S. C; Mrs. Audrey 
L. Welch, Atlanta, Ga.; Julius H. Spears. 
Chatham, Virginia. 

Mrs. Addie C. Sloan, Atlanta, Ga.; 
Mrs. Clara Francis, Bainbridge, Ga.; 
Miss Lucy A. Adams, Orangeburg, 
S. C. ; Mrs. Mary D. Stroman, Jackson, 
Ga.; Sister Sara Ann Abell, S.C.N.. 
Asheville, N. C; Paul B. Mohr, St. 
Petersburg. Fla.; Henry C. Dennis, 
Carlsbad, N. M., and Mrs. Gwendolyn 
T. Conyers, Bainbridge, Ga. 




Mrs. Lena B. Thomas is a teacher at McDuffie 
County. She is a 1960 graduate of Savannah 
State College with a major in Elementary Educa- 
tion. Her affiliations are: Georgia Teachers & 
Education Association, Masonic Order, Parent- 
Teacher Association, Cub Scouts Den Mother and 
a member of McDuffie-Warren Chapter of Savan- 
nah State College National Alumni Association. 




New Women's Dormitory 



19 



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SAVANNAH, GA.